GDPR

The first real test of GDPR

The fine issued to Google by France’s data protection regulator, is the first significant fine to one of the large tech giants, for failing to comply with Europe’s general data protection regulation (GDPR).  GDPR was designed to increase the protection for all EU citizens, eliminate confusion by harmonizing the many data privacy laws and change…


The fine issued to Google by France’s data protection regulator, is the first significant fine to one of the large tech giants, for failing to comply with Europe’s general data protection regulation (GDPR).  

GDPR was designed to increase the protection for all EU citizens, eliminate confusion by harmonizing the many data privacy laws and change businesses approach to personal data by introducing explicit transparency. It came into effect on May 25th 2018 and is the biggest change in data protection laws for 20 years, replacing the Data Protection Directive of 1995. Importantly, its impact is not restricted to EU organisations, but it will have implications for any company in the world that holds data on the continent or on any individual living in the EU – hence the fine issued to Google. 

Considering some of the data related breach’s that individuals have experienced in the past, GDPR is welcomed as great news for individuals, however it may present some complex challenges for companies. Particularly since any organisation found in breach of the new directive could face fines up to €20,000,000 euros, or up to 4% of the company’s profits from the previous year, whichever number is higher.

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Enforcement of GDPR

Generally, the EU is notoriously slow at both legislating and at enforcing its rules.  However, since it took effect in May 2018 three enforcement actions were issued that same year.

  • October 2018 – a local business in Austria was f

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GDPR

Data intelligence: why Data Protection Day is becoming increasingly important

The problem with data, whether it’s a report, an email, a spreadsheet or any other file type, is that internal personnel have to deal with it, typically through the uses of multiple applications in different locations with no real control. This raises significant questions around how this data is stored, shared and analysed.Every business must…


The problem with data, whether it’s a report, an email, a spreadsheet or any other file type, is that internal personnel have to deal with it, typically through the uses of multiple applications in different locations with no real control. This raises significant questions around how this data is stored, shared and analysed.

Every business must consider where and how their data is stored and shared, and make sure their processes are GDPR-compliant.

  • Satya Nadella calls for global GDPR
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  • Tim Cook praises GDPR, warns about “weaponised data”

Managing data

The first aspect to look at is the encryption level. Low standards of encryption make it easy to hack sensitive information. However, even a system that has bank-level security encryption is only as strong as the permission levels assigned to the people who need to handle the data. For example, even if there are platforms preventing spreadsheet data leakage, one can still take a picture of a computer screen.

Accountability and data governance are becoming more and more scrutinised. Consider this case: British bank Barclays sent an offer to purchase another firm in 2008 that hid—instead of deleted—nearly 200 spreadsheet cells, resulting in unneces

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GDPR

5 things to consider when selecting your next online storage provider

As the demand for managed cloud and professional services rises, the considerations behind choosing the right cloud storage partner becomes more pertinent. There is a large range of variables that affect these providers’ ability to keep your data secure, your connectivity robust, and your costs low.Most data centres were “state-of-the-art” when they were built, yet…


As the demand for managed cloud and professional services rises, the considerations behind choosing the right cloud storage partner becomes more pertinent. There is a large range of variables that affect these providers’ ability to keep your data secure, your connectivity robust, and your costs low.

Most data centres were “state-of-the-art” when they were built, yet infrastructure quickly becomes obsolete if it does not adapt to the constant changes in regulation, cyber threats, and users’ needs and expectations.

Choosing the wrong cloud storage provider can have significant consequence on a business’s operations, including factors such as performance and business continuity problems, security vulnerabilities, and costs.

It pays to do due diligence before beginning a relationship of such strategic importance, so here are the five most important questions you should ask when choosing a cloud storage provider.

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1. Location, location, location

In today’s hyper-connected world, it may not seem important if your data is located across town or on the other side of the world. In fact, it’s crucial to know exactly where your precious data will reside. This is important not just from a legal point of view (with legislation such as GDPR governing where some data resides) but also for a range of business continuity and performance factors.

With business-c

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GDPR

Why it’s high time we regulated Big Tech

Over the past year since GDPR came into play, there have been a number of high-profile fines for the big tech giants like Facebook, and a growing appetite for regulation of this industry. These big tech businesses continue to grow more or less exponentially and have a huge amount of influence in all areas of our…


Over the past year since GDPR came into play, there have been a number of high-profile fines for the big tech giants like Facebook, and a growing appetite for regulation of this industry. 

These big tech businesses continue to grow more or less exponentially and have a huge amount of influence in all areas of our lives, from politics to news and education to business, and yet we continue to trust them with our data. Even Facebook, which was at the centre of one of the biggest advertising scandals in history, has continued without regulation on its powers but it has a duty of care for its users.

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More regulations please! But why?

I want to highlight why tech regulation is needed for the industry. Should these businesses be able to continue to have such a significant impact on every area of our lives, with little to no punishment for breaches of our trust? Alternatively, do we need to find a new way to regulate the tech sector, to avoid fines that are insignificant in proportion to their revenue?

One of

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GDPR

Don’t take risk with data protection in your business

The issues of data privacy and data security are a source of significant concern for organisations in today’s digital world. Whether this is due to increased emphasis on regulatory compliance (GDPR), or the efficiency of cyber criminals seeking out vulnerable data, there is no getting away from how important it is to have the right…


The issues of data privacy and data security are a source of significant concern for organisations in today’s digital world. Whether this is due to increased emphasis on regulatory compliance (GDPR), or the efficiency of cyber criminals seeking out vulnerable data, there is no getting away from how important it is to have the right processes and solutions in place.

However, it’s becoming more difficult to ensure data is safe and secure. In fact, 64 percent of global IT decision-makers agree that protecting business-critical data has not become easier over the past five years, despite advances in technology made to do so. 

The general public is also increasingly sensitive about the security of their data, especially considering recent high-profile incidents (some even involving data protection providers) and have been known to cut ties with organisations they deem unworthy of their trust. In this climate, any loss of customer data could severely dent an organisation’s reputation and customer confidence.  

Which raises the question, how can organisations be better positioned to deliver on cus

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