GDPR

Sign in with Apple a headache for developers?

Apple’s flagship Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) event always sparks weeks of anticipation and then dissection of each and every announcement. The gadgets get the biggest headlines and then after a while, some of the less-heralded (but probably more interesting) features start to gain attention. One of the most interesting from WWDC 2019 is Sign in with…


Apple’s flagship Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) event always sparks weeks of anticipation and then dissection of each and every announcement. The gadgets get the biggest headlines and then after a while, some of the less-heralded (but probably more interesting) features start to gain attention. 

One of the most interesting from WWDC 2019 is Sign in with Apple. Sign in with Apple went live with the iOS 13 update in September and gives the 1.4 billion Apple product users a frictionless login and signup experience, and greater control of their data.

About the author

Matias Wolosk is the CTO & Co-Founder of Auth0.

iPhones, iPadOS for iPads, and MacOS for iMacs and MacBooks, can leverage Face ID or Touch ID, eliminating the need for usernames and passwords all together. These login options are also protected by two-factor authentication, providing ample security measures to those who choose to sign in as such.

From a privacy perspective, Apple has stated that they will not track or profile users who adopt Sign in with Apple, limiting disclosed information to a name and email address. Furthermore, for those who do not wish to share their email with a chosen app, there is a ‘hide my email’ option, which prompts Apple to produce a unique email for each app.

Why is Apple doing this now?

GDPR has and continues to have a major influence over the way that businesses conduct themselves, especially those that operate within the tech sector. It has become

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GDPR

This privacy-friendly employee monitoring software has your employees buy in to data protection

Data breaches, both internal and external, are on the rise, with no sign of stopping. Of thousands of companies surveyed, half have experienced breaches, mostly over the last three years, and nine of ten breaches occur not due to internal malfeasance or breaches to data protection companies, but rather due to employee errors giving bad…


Data breaches, both internal and external,are on the rise, with no sign of stopping. Of thousands of companies surveyed,half have experienced breaches, mostly over the last three years, and nine of ten breaches occur not due to internal malfeasance or breaches to data protection companies, but rather due toemployee errorsgiving bad actors inside access.

So rather than focus efforts on securing your network from external assaults, companies need to protect themselves from their own inattentive employees. While educating and training employees about potential threats is a good first step, it can only go so far. You need a more comprehensive solution. Unfortunately, the most effective solutions such as employee monitoring software might be seen by employees as breaching their privacy rights. These software track employees’ potentially suspicious or misguided activity; notify security teams instantly if a suspected breach has occurred; and give those teams the ability to instantly take over any workstation and cut off any potential data loss. Plus, the best software solutions analyze user behavior and predict insider threats. The software can even automatically act to block any dangerous activity that might lead to a data breach. In most cases you can step in and de-escalate problems before they become an actual security threat.

For most employee monitoring software companies, this is a blanket solution, with every employee treated as an equally potential threat and little regard is given to preserving privacy. But the industry-leading security service Teramind encourages its customers to eschew this us-versus-them mentality and transparently protect your employees from their worst impulses while also protecting their privacy from their own mistakes.

The Teramind dashboard: customers can create their own dashboard from a selection of dozens of widgets, based on their priorities or areas of particular concern.

The Teramind dashboard: customers can create their own dashboard from a selection of dozens of widgets, based on their priorities or areas of particular concern.(Image credit: Teramind)

Teramindis anISO2001:2013-certifiedcompany that aims to align its products with regulatory standards like CCPA,GDPRandHIPAA. And it has received acclaim from several tech sites for the effectiveness of its services, includingTechRadar.

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A personalized protection plan

A sample list of behavioral policies and rules that can be created on Teramind. The solution comes with hundreds of pre-built rules to prevent common insider threats and data breaches. 

A sample list of behavioral policies and rules that can be created on Teramind. The solution comes with hundreds of pre-built rules to prevent common insider threats and data breaches. (Image credit: Teramind)

The solution comes with three pricing tiers and available as Cloud, On-Premise or Private Cloud deployment (such as AWS, Azure) making it suitable for SMEs to large enterprise customers.

Each of the three pricing levels o

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GDPR

What will cyber security look like in 2020?

It’s true; the future of cyber security is AI. It’s advancing daily, and eventually, all antivirus and general security protection will be provided by AI-enabled analysis. But we’re some way off this yet, and despite advances, AI is only one element in building our security defences against future cyber threats.  It is important to take a…


It’s true; the future of cyber security is AI. 

It’s advancing daily, and eventually, all antivirus and general security protection will be provided by AI-enabled analysis. But we’re some way off this yet, and despite advances, AI is only one element in building our security defences against future cyber threats.  It is important to take a risk and business-centric approach to gathering and examining threat intelligence and making informed decisions on this at Board level. 

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Risks to an organisation can emerge despite having made significant investment in security controls.  We can become complacent once that initial investment has been made and forget that buying a tool is the beginning, and not the end, of the journey. SIEM products provide the best example of this. So, we have a big tick on the spreadsheet next to ‘security’, but does it really mean that the organisation’s defence is any better? 

The effectiveness of the product is conditional upon the organisation’s depth of expertise in being able to tune the solution to the specific and properly defined protective security monitoring objectives. It’s rare that organisations have the necessary in-house skills to be able to do this and if they do, you can be sure they will be ‘headhunted’ before too much longer. This complacency, of just investing in software and thinking that it will meet all our requirements ‘out of the box’ rather than understanding potential threats and how the product can help us to manage these, is likely to be leaving your organisation open to attack. 

About the author

Neil Kell is the Director of Evolve Secure Solutions, part of the CSI Group.

Sector-specific security threats

Risk is coming from all around and your defence may not be as strong as it can be because – it hasn’t been managed correctly; it hasn’t been tailored to your environment; strategic decisions haven’t been made, or you bought a product and you don’t completely understand how to get the best out of it. 

With much confusion still existing around cyber security, and an industry that is driven by selling the latest security products, leaning solely on technology to address threats to your organisati

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GDPR

The evolution of disaster recovery

As the turn of the year rears its head once again, it’s time to look at what’s set to change in the business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR) industry over the next 12 months.In 2020, we’ll see the market shift with technologies like AI and blockchain becoming more mainstream. IT service management will also find…


As the turn of the year rears its head once again, it’s time to look at what’s set to change in the business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR) industry over the next 12 months.

In 2020, we’ll see the market shift with technologies like AI and blockchain becoming more mainstream. IT service management will also find environments will continue to grow in complexity, more companies and countries will adopt cloud-first mandates and vendors will turn their attention to simplifying the migration of applications to the cloud.

Here’s how we see the year panning out:

About the author

Mick Bradley is VP EMEA Sales at Arcserve.

Emerging technologies that will shape the BCDR landscape

Investments from international brands such as FedEx and Walmart in 2019 are an indication that blockchain is being taken seriously as a means of achieving greater transparency and auditability. Facebook also announced its intention to launch its blockchain-based cryptocurrency in June, sparking widespread debate. As more big names funnel resources into blockchain-related R&D, we’ll see a greater number of real-world and enterprise applications of the technology in active use.

However, claims that the technology is immune to compromise, and corruption should be taken with a pinch of salt. As more organisations adopt blockchain, we’ll see an increase in data loss as many will believe that it’s inherently secure and not consider the varying levels of security and access control that comes with the technology. Without incorporating this factor into a BCDR plan, will leave organisations vulnerable to attacks and threats.

Greater focus on data management and governance

Organisations will also call for more than just the ability to store, process and keep data available in 2020. There will be an increase in data classification—the process of organising data by categor

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GDPR

2020 cybersecurity – putting the house in order

Cybersecurity has constantly been in the news, both because of publicized breaches, but also because of data protection laws. Here Nik Whitfield explains why businesses need to think beyond security simply in terms of password protection and antivirus software, and look to implement better cybersecurity planning.GDPR penalty to date of $230 million. The ICO found…


Cybersecurity has constantly been in the news, both because of publicized breaches, but also because of data protection laws. Here Nik Whitfield explains why businesses need to think beyond security simply in terms of password protection andantivirus software, and look to implement better cybersecurity planning.

GDPR penalty to date of $230 million. The ICO found that it had been ‘compromised by poor security arrangements’ and the company was fined accordingly. 

This is proving to be a wake-up call for the whole cyber market. Boards are looking at these fines and asking their security teams: ‘do we have poor security arrangements?’ Many wil

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