Internet Security

Report: At least 25% of consumers use biometrics for online security

Hear from CIOs, CTOs, and other C-level and senior execs on data and AI strategies at the Future of Work Summit this January 12, 2022. Learn more Biometrics are beginning to move mainstream for online authentication, with at least 25% of consumers now using biometrics in some capacity, according to the FIDO Alliance’s Online Authentication…

Hear from CIOs, CTOs, and other C-level and senior execs on data and AI strategies at the Future of Work Summit this January 12, 2022. Learn more


Biometrics are beginning to move mainstream for online authentication, with at least 25% of consumers now using biometrics in some capacity, according to the FIDO Alliance’s Online Authentication Barometer report. For this research, the FIDO Alliance set out to discover the latest in consumer habits, trends, and the adoption of authentication technologies across the globe. This is the first report in its Online Authentication Barometer series that will periodically review and monitor the state of online authentication in ten countries across the globe. Future releases of the barometer will be able to compare changes in behaviors and attitudes over time.

This could be a factor in why biometrics are the second most commonly used method for login. Here

The report found passwords still prevailed over other, more secure authentication methods, with 59% of people using them to log into a work account or computer in the last 60 days. While this is unsurprising, with passwords dominating online authentication for many years, the report did also find indicators that the tide is changing. Most notably, biometrics are gaining traction, both in perception of security and usage — 32% of consumers now believe biometrics are the most secure way to log into their online accounts, apps and devices, compared to passwords at 19%. In addition, biometrics was the second most commonly used method for login, with 28% citing it as

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Internet Security

Solana Attack: Slope Is to Blame; Sam Bankman Extends Support

Following yesterday’s attack on the Solana ecosystem, information is now emerging suggesting wallet provider Slope is primarily to blame for the security flaw that allowed thousands of Solana customers to have their cryptocurrency stolen. Slope is a layer-1 (L1) Web3 wallet service for the Solana blockchain…

Following yesterday’s attack on the Solana ecosystem, information is now emerging suggesting wallet provider Slope is primarily to blame for the security flaw that allowed thousands of Solana customers to have their cryptocurrency stolen. Slope is a layer-1 (L1) Web3 wallet service for the Solana blockchain…
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Internet Security

Solana and Slope Confirm Wallet Security Breach

Key Takeaways Solana has confirmed that addresses affected by today’s security breach were created or used within the Slope wallet. Slope also published an official statement on the situation, noting that it will provide a full postmortem in the future. Full details of the attack are still under investigation. Share this article URL Copied The…

Key Takeaways

  • Solana has confirmed that addresses affected by today’s security breach were created or used within the Slope wallet.
  • Slope also published an official statement on the situation, noting that it will provide a full postmortem in the future.
  • Full details of the attack are still under investigation.

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The Solana Foundation and Slope have provided additional information on a security breach that affected thousands of wallets today.

Solana Confirms Wallet Breach

The Solana Foundation has published new details about today’s attack.

Earlier, nearly 8,000 addresses were drained through what was believed to be a breach of the third-party wallet app Slope.

This afternoon, the Solana Foundation confirmed on the Solana Status Twitter account that the addresses affected by the attack “were at one point created, imported, or used in Slope mobile wallet applications.”

It added that private key information was accidentally transmitted to an application monitoring service. It said that further details “are still under investigation.”

The attack only affected Slope’s downloadable wallet app; Slope hardware wallets are still secure. Though thousands of wallets were drained, the Solana Foundation added that the Solana protocol itself remains secure.

Slope also commented on the situation. It said that a “cohort” of Slope wallets were compromised and confirmed that several of its own staff wallets were drained.

Slope said that it had not confirmed the nature of the attack. “We have some hypotheses as to the nature of the breach, but nothing is yet firm,” Slope said in its official statement. It committed to publishing a full post-mortem in the future.

The company also suggested that users take action to secure their funds. It advised users to create a new seed phrase and wallet and transfer their funds to that wallet.

Both companies say that they are performing internal investigations and working with external auditors.

Various other individuals within the Solana ecosystem provided information and speculated on the attack earlier today.

At least two other projects in the Solana ecosystem have been hacked this year. Cashio was hacked for $28 million in March, while Wormhole was hacked for $322 million in February.

Disclosure: At the time of writing, the author of this piece owned BTC, ETH, and other cryptocurrencies.

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Internet Security

How automation is transforming security and compliance

Presented by Vanta

Presented by Vanta


Security is more than a threat mitigator — it’s a growth enabler too. Catch up with this VB On-Demand event to learn how an automated security and compliance improves your security posture, helps meet SOC 2, HIPAA, or ISO 27001 regulations, gets you compliant fast, and more.

Watch free on demand here.


Cyber criminals are getting smarter, their attacks are continuously evolving, and their successes are leaving marks. Assaults are scaled effortlessly, from the one-to-one text phishing attempts on employees who post about new jobs on LinkedIn, to the “unprecedented” campaign against the Costa Rican government that brought much of their infrastructure to a standstill, resulting in losses of $125 million over 48 hours.

“What’s notable is the sophistication,” says Kaitlin Pettersen, VP of customer experience at Vanta. “The seeming legitimacy is improving. They’re getting smarter. They’re getting more strategic, and the financial and reputational cost of these data breaches is high.”

Customer trust is easily lost, but not easily won back — and that directly impacts your bottom line. Globally, fines for GDPR violations are huge, but smaller companies are also facing financial consequences for violations. The CCPA in California opens the door to lawsuits from customers whose data was involv

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Internet Security

2 police officers face off over who is boss

Social media users are concerned about a video of two security officers in a heated altercation…

Social media users are concerned about a video of two security officers in a heated altercation…
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