GDPR

Germany orders Facbook to stop combining user data from multiple sources into one

The people behind “move fast and break things” are about to get disrupted themselves. The German regulation body that monitors competition has ordered Facebook to stop some of its core activities, unless it gets more explicit user consent (via the BBC). That includes combining the data Facebook gains about users from external websites into their…


The people behind “move fast and break things” are about to get disrupted themselves.

The German regulation body that monitors competition has ordered Facebook to stop some of its core activities, unless it gets more explicit user consent (via the BBC). That includes combining the data Facebook gains about users from external websites into their backend Facebook profiles. As well as combining the accounts of people on Facebook-owned companies, including WhatsApp and Instagram. 

While the new orders concern user privacy, the body is actually instituting its terms because they say the way Facebook has consolidated user information across websites and social platforms has given them an unfair competitive advantage.

“The combination of data sources substantially contributed to the fact that Facebook was able to build a unique database for each individual user and thus to gain market power.”

Facebook released a blog post Thursday directly refuting the order, entitled “Why We Disagree With the Bundeskartellamt” (the name of the agency). In the post, it defends its actions on both privacy and competitive grounds. And, Facebook says that the competition agency shouldn’t have jurisdiction over this matter.

“The GDPR specifically empowers data protection regulators – not competition authorities – to dete

Read More

Be the first to write a comment.

Leave a Reply

GDPR

Data Protection Day: Spotlighting DNS for all the right reasons

January 28th has come and gone, leaving in its wake the ever-growing reminder of the importance of protecting personal information online. While it applies to both private citizens and corporate networks alike, Data Protection Day began in Europe to raise awareness on personal data privacy rights, and has deep undertones to businesses.  The effects of…


January 28th has come and gone, leaving in its wake the ever-growing reminder of the importance of protecting personal information online. While it applies to both private citizens and corporate networks alike, Data Protection Day began in Europe to raise awareness on personal data privacy rights, and has deep undertones to businesses.  

The effects of their non-compliance with GDPR regulations should begin to accelerate this year, with Gartner predicting upwards of a billion euros in issued sanctions by the end of 2021. This makes it even more important to keep security top-of-mindthroughoutthe year, particularly when it comes to backdoors into a network.

While most security tools block data transfer mechanisms like File Transfer Protocol (FTP), common internet protocol like the Domain Name System (DNS) are often left unsecured giving attackers a loophole; one where connections to arbitrary servers aren’t blocked. Hence, the DNS protocol is widely recognised as a prime target for data exfiltration. In astudy conducted in 2018, it was highlighted that 33% of companies were victims of data stolen via the DNS, so exfiltration via DNS has become a major concern to businesses in the midst of becoming compliant to data privacy laws.  

  • Data Protection Day 2019: Privacy firmly in the limelight
  • 2019 is the year we discover the true cost of poor data protection
  • Here is the one reason why compan

Read More

Continue Reading
GDPR

The ramifications of GDPR

It’s been hard to avoid, the implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has caused a stir amongst businesses. And nearly a year on, it remains in the front of our minds. The EU wide legislation has been seen as one of the most rigorous and ambitious data protection laws in the world, and many…


It’s been hard to avoid, the implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has caused a stir amongst businesses. And nearly a year on, it remains in the front of our minds. 

The EU wide legislation has been seen as one of the most rigorous and ambitious data protection laws in the world, and many countries are now trying to follow suit. It has already expanded to the USA (in California), India and Brazil, and other countries are expected to follow suit in the coming months. But, it shouldn’t be seen as an inconvenience for business, the regulations have the potential to transform how we engage with customers, and ultimately allow us to build trust.  

Many companies have struggled to navigate the regulations, with it being very difficult to understand what was required to ensure compliance. 

  • What is GDPR
  • Best endpoint security software
  • What is data protection day

Over the past year, areporthas shown that only 26 percent of UK businesses have successfully addressed data requests from individuals seeking to obtain a copy of their data within the one-month time limit required by GDPR. However, with Google’s record fine of £44 million following its breach of GDPR, ongoing coverage of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, and global Data Protection Day (January 28th) continuing to drive support for further data protection regulati

Read More

Continue Reading
GDPR

Google vs. GDPR: the ripple effect of the biggest data protection fine to date

It’s not the first time, nor will it be the last. On 21 January 2019, a business was found guilty of breaching the General Data Protect Regulation (GDPR) and now faces a financial penalty as a result. This is a similar story to what we’ve continually witnessed in the headlines since the implementation of GDPR…


It’s not the first time, nor will it be the last. On 21 January 2019, a business was found guilty of breaching the General Data Protect Regulation (GDPR) and now faces a financial penalty as a result. This is a similar story to what we’ve continually witnessed in the headlines since the implementation of GDPR in May 2018. So why is this case any different? This time, the business in question was Google.

The formula remains the same – company X breaches Y regulation and is therefore fined Z amount. But the fact of the matter is that, in this particular situation, it wasn’t just any company breaching GDPR. It was a tech giant, one whose name is synonymous with using data to provide us with information and optimise our experiences. And it’s not just a standard penalty – it’s £44 million. With such a huge organisation being fined an eye-watering sum of money, the question now isn’t simply what does this mean for Google – but what effect will this have globally?   

  • This is everything you need to know about GDPR
  • Save your data in the cloud with the best cloud storage
  • Browse the web on public WiFi securely with the best VPN 

Breaching GDPR

Since its inception in April 2016, GDPR has been the hot topic on almost all business agendas. With just over two years to identify, collate, and effectively store consumer data, businesse

Read More

Continue Reading
GDPR

Privacy activists say online ad industry knowingly violated GDPR

Privacy advocates claim that an organization that represents the online ad industry knew they would be violating privacy laws, but did so anyway, in an updated complaint filed against the group as well as Google. On Tuesday, the group filed new evidence with data protection authorities in the UK and Ireland against Google and the…


Privacy advocates claim that an organization that represents the online ad industry knew they would be violating privacy laws, but did so anyway, in an updated complaint filed against the group as well as Google.

On Tuesday, the group filed new evidence with data protection authorities in the UK and Ireland against Google and the Internet Advertising Bureau (IAB), the industry association that creates standards and guidelines for online ad practices. 

The new filing includes documents which allegedly show that the IAB knew its ad system would be illegal under the General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR, a law that protects personal data and privacy for individuals within the European Union.

At the heart of the GDPR complaint is the real-time bidding (RTB) system deployed by virtually every internet advertising company. The filings claim to show evidence that the ad system used by Google and the IAB shares sensitive personal data hundreds of billions of times a day. 

Before a user is served with an ad on a website, their personal data is often shared with third-party companies that take part in an automated

Read More

Continue Reading