Android, Apple, Enterprise, GDPR, Internet Security, iPhone, Mobile, OS X

Do I need a VPN for 2018?

With a growing concern for privacy on the internet – many users are asking the question, “Do I need a…

With a growing concern for privacy on the internet – many users are asking the question, “Do I need a VPN for 2018?”. In this article we aim to give you some basic knowledge of VPNs in relation to your privacy and security online.

 

What is a VPN?

VPN is an acronym for Virtual Private Network.

A VPN creates a secure network connection over a public network such as the internet.

Corporations, Government agencies and Schools use VPNs to create a secure network over the internet to allow users access to resources as if they were physically at the main office location.

As it is a Private network, users need to authenticate with a unique identity and password for extra security.

In the context of this article a VPN is a 3rd party provider that allows you access to their network to appear as if you are accessing the internet from their location.

 

So why do I need a VPN?

There are many reasons why an average user should make use of a VPN.

The most common reason is people who simply want the privacy of knowing their ISP is unable to see what they are doing online. By using a VPN for everything they do online, this user knows that no one is able to pry into their communications.

Bit torrent users are big advocates of VPN usage. Whether they are downloading legal or illegal content (such as moves/tv shows) many Bit torrent users don’t want to become part of an ISPs list just because they have a bit torrent client active.

Another reason would be if you are making extensive use of free/paid wifi locations around the world. By making use of a VPN you are ensuring that any data that you transmit is securely encrypted and can’t be accessed by unscrupulous hotspot operators.

An increasingly more common use for VPNs is spoofing your location for geo-locked content. Many Netflix users are using VPNs to access content from other countries, e.g. a UK user spoofing their location as the US to access a much larger content library.

Some VPN users do so because it allows them to evade censorship by networks, such as schools, work or even your ISPs. Using a VPN allows the user to bypass any restrictions that these networks may have with standard content filters.

 

What are the advantages/disadvantages of a VPN?

Simply put, instead of accessing the internet directly through your ISP, you access the internet through an encrypted/secure VPN tunnel.

Without a VPN, when you access any information online it goes through your ISPs servers. This allows your ISP to see anything and everything that you do online.

With a VPN, you connect to a server run by the VPN provider. This is done through an encrypted connection. By doing so the only information your ISP can see is fully encrypted. This makes it impossible for them to monitor any of your activity.

When connected to a VPN server, your web browsing/activities all appear to be done from the IP address of that VPN server. As mentioned previously, this means that your physical location is also hidden as well as any data you access.

A major disadvantage of using a VPN is that your internet speeds will slow down due to the encrypting/decrypting of all the information you access online. This does use some extra processing power but nothing too noticeable on modern technology.

Using a VPN also adds extra hops on your data’s journey through the internet, this simply means your data has to travel further and therefore slows down your connection slightly.

Probably the biggest concern for users who sign up for a VPN service is that the VPN provider can access their internet activity instead. This moves the privacy concern away from their ISP to another company. This is why users should be very careful when selecting a VPN provider as we detail further on in this article.

 

Is using a VPN legal?

The vast majority of countries have laws in place that mean users have the legal right to privacy. Therefore VPN services are very much legal in these countries.

Very few countries, such as China and Iraq, have banned usage of VPN services.  Some countries such as Iran have made it a requirement that the only legal VPNs are those registered and approved by the government, therefore making them virtually useless.

 

Free or Paid?

It is widely believed that using a free VPN is a bad idea for security. Running a VPN service is not free and therefore most free services will not be as secure as a well-reviewed paid service. A free VPN service has to pay their bills somehow and this is likely through handing off users browsing data for a price!

Just because a VPN provider offers a paid service does not automatically mean they are secure and trustworthy.

 

How do I choose a VPN for 2018?

Choosing a VPN means considering all the things a VPN service can offer. As always, doing your own research on all of these subjects is highly recommended, there is no such thing as a perfect VPN that does it all!

Below are some topics to consider when choosing a VPN for 2018.

  • Price – How much do you want to spend?
  • Speed – Many VPNs offer a free trial where you can speed test the connection.
  • Privacy – Does the VPN provider keep logs?
  • Support – Is the customer support quick to respond, do they provide good answers?
  • Software – Do they offer a VPN client for all platforms (Windows, OS X, Android, iOS)?
  • Servers – Is there a large geographical selection of servers to choose from?

 

Recommendations for a VPN for 2018

Here are some recommendations for reputable VPN providers. As mentioned above you should always do your own research with your specific needs to find the most suitable VPN!

 

PrivateInternetAccess (PIA) – https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/

  • No logs
  • Accepts Bitcoin payment for anonymity focused users
  • Kill switch and DNS leak protection

 

ExpressVPN – https://www.expressvpn.com/

  • Offers 94 geographical locations
  • 256bit encryption
  • Excellent rated support

 

NordVPN – https://nordvpn.com/

  • 61 countries
  • Excellent rated support
  • No logs policy

 

PrivateVPN – https://privatevpn.com/

  • 30-day money back guarantee
  • 6 simultaneous connections
  • Well rated mobile apps

 

That One Privacy Site (www.thatoneprivacysite.net) offers a tool that allows you to compare a massive selection of VPN providers – https://thatoneprivacysite.net/simple-vpn-comparison-chart/

Be the first to write a comment.

Leave a Reply

GDPR

Value of GDPR fines shows dramatic increase in 2020

Value of GDPR fines shows dramatic increase in 2020

Value of GDPR fines shows dramatic increase in 2020
Read More

Continue Reading
Internet Security

‘Real Life Call of Duty’: Tabraiz Shamsi on security arrangement after landing in Pakistan

South African spinner posted on Social Media showing the security arrangement after their team landed in Pakistan for Test and T20I series

South African spinner posted on Social Media showing the security arrangement after their team landed in Pakistan for Test and T20I series
Read More

Continue Reading
Apple

‘A Fireable Offense.’ Law Enforcement Agencies Grapple With Police Officers’ Involvement in U.S. Capitol Riots

By Josiah Bates Updated: January 15, 2021 9:52 AM EST | Originally published: January 14, 2021 4:23 PM EST A New Hampshire police chief; a Philadelphia detective; two Seattle Police Department officers who traveled cross-country, to name just a few. In the aftermath of the historic insurrection that took place in Washington D.C. last week,…

By Josiah Bates
Updated: January 15, 2021 9:52 AM EST | Originally published: January 14, 2021 4:23 PM EST

A New Hampshire police chief; a Philadelphia detective; two Seattle Police Department officers who traveled cross-country, to name just a few. In the aftermath of the historic insurrection that took place in Washington D.C. last week, which left five people—including a Capitol police officer—dead, police departments across the U.S. have begun reckoning with the likelihood that their sworn-in officers participated in the rallies and rioting.

According to a tracker on The Appeal, as of Jan. 15 a total of 29 law enforcement officers or officials are suspected of participating in President Trump’s Jan. 6 rally, and/or joining the crowds storming the U.S. Capitol later that day. In addition, the FBI has identified more than 200 rioters who were part of the insurrection.

“[One guy] pulled out his badge and he said, ‘We’re doing this for you,’” one Capitol police officer told BuzzFeed News of encountering law enforcement-affiliated rioters. “Another guy had his badge. So I was like, ‘Well, you gotta be kidding.’”

“From my perspective, any police officer sworn to protect the constitution and the rule of law [who is] found to have engaged in the attack on the Capitol will be facing some very severe sanctions,” Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo tells TIME. “To think that there were police officers who participated in this plot against our country and this attack against our country, it’s heart-wrenching. It’s a fireable offense.”

“The nature of the threat is unprecedented. The threat is not just to the capitol or to the inauguration. The threat is to the government itself,” Chief Acevedo added of a recent warning from the FBI that further violent protests are also expected in D.C.—and across the U.S.—in the run-up to Joe Biden’s inauguration.

A day after Acevedo spoke with TIME, a Houston Police Department officer was identified among those entering the Capitol during the riots. He is expected to face federal charges and has resigned from duty.

Read more: Security Officials Face the Possibility of a Threat from the Inside on Inauguration Day

Acevedo, who is President of the Major Cities Chiefs Association, a national organization of law enforcement leaders, says that officers are allowed to exercise their First Amendment rights—and to protest in support of the president—but notes that there is “a very distinct line between first protected protests and violence.”

“There’s First Amendment rights but anyone that was actually inside the Capitol… that’s enough for termination,” adds Lynda Garcia, director of the policing program at The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights. Garcia says she was “surprised” to see “law enforcement officials turn on their own and engage in an act of insurrection.”

Internal investigations are underway in police departments in New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, North Carolina and Washington; members of the Capitol police department have been suspended amid investigation into conduct “that appear to be in violation of Department regulations and policies.” The FBI is also reportedly also involved in at least three investigations involving the Houston Police Department, the Los Angeles Police Department and the Bexar County Sheriff’s office in Texas. Two police officers from the Rocky Mount, Virginia police department have been charged with misdemeanors by federal authorities after being inside the Capitol during the riots. Those officers are currently “on leave.”

And as more rioters are identified on social media—in many cases due to social media updates they’d themselves shared from D.C. on Jan. 6— public calls for officers to be fired or held accountable for their alleged involvement are growing. Five public defenders in Kentucky are calling for an investigation into a Franklin County Sheriff’s deputy who posted on Facebook about how “epic” the day was going to be, for example. The deputy’s Facebook page has since been deleted.

Beyond those in attendance, multiple reports have highlighted law enforcement officials’ using social media or otherwise speaking out to express support for those who rallied and rioted. John Catanzara, President of Chicago’s Fraternal Order of Police Lodge, said he understood the participants’ frustrations. “There was no arson, there was no burning of anything, there was no looting, there was very little destruction of property,” Catanzara told WBEZ in an interview on Jan. 7. “It was a bunch of pissed-off people that feel an election was stolen, somehow, some way.”

Subsequent reports have revealed that the damage to the Capitol, which included instances of looting and vandalism, was far more extensive—as was the planning of many involved.

“If the worst crime here is trespassing, so be it,” Catanzara continue

!–>
Read More

Continue Reading
GDPR

GDPR: German laptop retailer fined €10.4m for video-monitoring employees

NBB (notebooksbilliger.de) described the GDPR fine “as wrong as it is irresponsible.”

NBB (notebooksbilliger.de) described the GDPR fine “as wrong as it is irresponsible.”
Read More

Continue Reading