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10 Cyber Security trends to look out for in 2018

It is still too early to predict whether 2018 will be safer than 2017 when it comes to cybersecurity. It…

It is still too early to predict whether 2018 will be safer than 2017 when it comes to cybersecurity. It is fair enough to say that this question has been raised since last year wasn’t the best for many IT companies and global organizations. However, experts have already made a few predictions for 2018 based on the current cyber security trends. Let’s have a look at them one at a time:

 

1) A.I. Cybersecurity

Artificial intelligence has come a long way from where it once started. AI-powered programs today are capable of monitoring events which can help identify incoming cyber attacks. However, according to experts, cybersecurity AI may beat the purpose for what it is designed as it may be able to assist hackers in carrying out even more complex attacks. Some have even called them double-edged swords.

 

2) IoT (Internet of Things) with improved security features

Internet of Things, which is a growing topic of conversation today, is the correlation of computing devices with physical objects via the internet, such that they are able to send and receive data. From Apple Watches to Nest Thermostats, IoT will see a growth like never before with some professionals estimating over 20 billion connected units by the end of this year. If anything can cause an obstacle in this positive transformation, it would certainly be a collapse of security. After the massive amounts of DDoS attacks in 2017, security leaders have gotten a heads up about possible compromises through IoT devices. We certainly can expect a good amount of improved security features associated with IoT devices this year.

 

3) Biometric Authentication

Let’s face the truth! Usernames and Passwords suck! They are impersonal and put a burden on users in remembering them. With the introduction of fingerprint sensors on mobile phones and the huge success of Apple’s FaceID, we should expect more of biometric-enabled devices in the coming months. While it might be a little too early to expect biometric authentication in all our daily accounts, we might see a start of a new identity authentication evolution.

 

4) GDPR – General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

General Data Protection Regulation is probably something we haven’t heard till lately. GDPR is a set of regulations, expected to go into effect on May 25, 2018, that is intended to strengthen data protection for all individuals and businesses within the European Union. While its to early to predict anything, the GDPR is expected to have a significant influence on the digital sector of Europe.

 

5) Cyber attacks on global organizations

Mainframes are the backbone of most global organizations. These are the computers responsible for processing bulk data such as statistics, census, bank operations and ATM transactions. While security firms focus more on protecting mobile and computer systems, mainframes are being overlooked.

 

6) Cloud security

With the automotive industry recently joining the cloud family, providing users with state of the art navigation systems, it is predicted that there would be huge investments to secure the cloud environment. The priority would be to generate trust among cloud users to store data without hesitation on servers they don’t own.

 

7) Increase in Ransomware

Ransomware, as the name suggests, is a malicious virus where the victim’s access to information is blocked unless a ransom is paid. Typically, the ransom amount is in hundreds or thousands of dollars although sometimes even higher. Last year itself, there has been an increase of 36 percent of ransomware and the trend doesn’t seem to slow down. The Petya Ransomware that caused mayhem in almost all of Europe and other parts of the world in 2017 is a warning to expect more.

 

8) Cryptocurrencies and Blockchains

Cryptocurrencies have been an evolution. However, they do have certain drawbacks, especially when it comes to bitcoins. Since Bitcoin transactions do not require identity verification and can be done anonymously, they have fueled events of ransom threats like never before.

This is predicted to continue growing as we progress into 2018. Cryptocurrencies have been built around the concept of blockchains and this technology is just limited to them. While it is tough to predict what other implications blockchains might have on cybersecurity, some educated predictions say they could be used in decentralizing access control and improving identity management.

 

9) Threats to serverless apps

While serverless apps have some considerable advantages, they are potential threats to cyber-attacks, the reason being – the lack of servers. It might seem counter-intuitive at first as for the most part, the security of the serverless application is controlled by the customer itself. However, that isn’t always the best idea, as a users device might not always be the safest location to store important information.

 

10) Safer for everyone

2017 was a year when we experienced cyber attacks we have never seen before. Such events have pushed security experts to carry out careful investigations to make sure certain cybercrimes do not repeat. Governments and tech-firms have invested an immense amount of money to tackle a problem that caused more than $3 trillion of damages worldwide just last year. The increased amount of general awareness and the proper preparedness from various authorities should make the internet a much safer place for everyone.

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Android

Zuckerberg’s Privacy Manifesto is Actually About Messaging

A Privacy-Minded Vision for Social Networking” and thought it was either a deathbed conversion, a cynical ploy to avoid regulation and reassure users, or even just an absurd musing that the company has no intention of carrying out (much like the “Clear History” feature it announced almost a year ago, which has yet to materialize).I…


A Privacy-Minded Vision for Social Networking” and thought it was either a deathbed conversion, a cynical ploy to avoid regulation and reassure users, or even just an absurd musing that the company has no intention of carrying out (much like the “Clear History” feature it announced almost a year ago, which has yet to materialize).

I know I thought, at various points, all three of the above, and lots of other things to boot.

It’s even possible that you took Mr. Zuckerberg at his word, as former Microsoft wunderman Steven Sinofsky did, and credited him with realizing which way the winds are blowing and moving there with thoughtfulness and haste.

In fact, Zuckerberg’s essay was likely about none of those things, nor was it about privacy at all (more on that later).

It was about WeChat, WhatsApp, and iMessage.

Zuckerberg’s post, minus the PR, was a product road map. It’s aimed at adapting his business to counter one of the only remaining competitive threats to Facebook and Instagram: messaging. And it was a clever way to dress up that pivot as a consumer-friendly privacy play. Win, win!

Molly Wood (@mollywood) is an Ideas contributor at WIRED and the host and senior editor ofMarketplace Tech, a daily national radio broadcast covering the business of technology. She has covered the tech industry at CNET,The New York Times, and in various print, television, digital and audio formats for nearly 20 years. (Ouch.)

Facebook, the core product, is collapsing. I know that seems like a strong statement given the company’s 2 billion users, but, in fact, the News Feed is a wasteland of reposted memories, divisive propaganda, and the occasional baby picture. US users are abandoning it by the millions, user growth is flat, and personal sharing has been on the decline for years.

Regulation and even antitrust investigations are looming. Even a handful of advertisers are starting to move on, and the company’s brand reputation is sinking fast—a recent Axios poll put it at 94 out of 100, ahead of only the likes of the US government, Trump.org, Phillip Morris, and Wells Fargo.

Yes, Instagram looks like the next best hope for the empire, and certainly a lot of users leaving Facebook are landing on Insta. But it’s still a distant second in terms of usage, and while Facebook is bullishly pushing advertisers toward Stories, they bring in far less revenue than News Feed ads. Also, as Instagram’s product roadmap starts to look more and more like Facebook’s, the app could get a lot less appealing.

And if you really look at what teens, in particular, are doing, itincludessocial media, but by almost every measure, they’re texting. The biggest threat to Facebook and Instagram is messaging, and that’s why, if you strip away all the window dressing about privacy, this is the paragraph that matters most:

“Today we already see that private messaging, ephemeral stories, and small groups are by far the fastest growing areas of online communication. There are a number of reasons for this. Many people prefer the intimacy of communicating one-on-one or with just a few friends. People are more cautious of having a permanent record of what they’ve shared. And we all expect to be able to do things like payments privately and securely.”

China’s WeChat is the model that Zuckerberg almost certainly has in mind. It has about a billion users; combines messaging and calling with apps, payments, communications, and commerce; and essentially functions as a proxy for the internet for its users—who spend well over an hour a day us

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Crypto Currency

How much do you know about blockchain, cryptocurrency, and Bitcoin?

How much do you know about blockchain, cryptocurrency, and Bitcoin? mashable.com


How much do you know about blockchain, cryptocurrency, and Bitcoin? mashable.com
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GDPR

Data intelligence: why Data Protection Day is becoming increasingly important

The problem with data, whether it’s a report, an email, a spreadsheet or any other file type, is that internal personnel have to deal with it, typically through the uses of multiple applications in different locations with no real control. This raises significant questions around how this data is stored, shared and analysed.Every business must…


The problem with data, whether it’s a report, an email, a spreadsheet or any other file type, is that internal personnel have to deal with it, typically through the uses of multiple applications in different locations with no real control. This raises significant questions around how this data is stored, shared and analysed.

Every business must consider where and how their data is stored and shared, and make sure their processes are GDPR-compliant.

  • Satya Nadella calls for global GDPR
  • Majority of companies still aren’t GDPR-compliant
  • Tim Cook praises GDPR, warns about “weaponised data”

Managing data

The first aspect to look at is the encryption level. Low standards of encryption make it easy to hack sensitive information. However, even a system that has bank-level security encryption is only as strong as the permission levels assigned to the people who need to handle the data. For example, even if there are platforms preventing spreadsheet data leakage, one can still take a picture of a computer screen.

Accountability and data governance are becoming more and more scrutinised. Consider this case: British bank Barclays sent an offer to purchase another firm in 2008 that hid—instead of deleted—nearly 200 spreadsheet cells, resulting in unneces

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Internet Security

Can predictive analytics be made safe for humans?

Massive-scale predictive analytics is a relatively new phenomenon, one that challenges both decades of law as well as consumer thinking about privacy. As a technology, it may well save thousands of lives in applications like predictive medicine, but if it isn’t used carefully, it may prevent thousands from getting loans, for instance, if an underwriting…


Massive-scale predictive analyticsis a relatively new phenomenon, one that challenges both decades of law as well as consumer thinking about privacy.

As a technology, it may well save thousands of lives in applications like predictive medicine, but if it isn’t used carefully, it may prevent thousands from getting loans, for instance, if an underwriting algorithm is biased against certain users.

I chatted with Dennis Hirsch a few weeks ago about the challenges posed by this new data economy. Hirsch is a professor of law at Ohio State and head of its Program on Data and Governance. He’s also affiliated with the university’s Risk Institute.

“Data ethics is the new form of risk mitigation for the algorithmic economy,” he said. In a post-Cambridge Analytica world, every company has to assess what data it has on its customers and mitigate the risk of harm. How to do that, though, is at the cutting edge of the new field of data governance, which investigates the processes and policies through which organizations manage their data.

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“Traditional privacy regulation asks whether you gave someone notice and given them a choice,” he explains. That principle is the bedrock for Europe’s GDPR law, and for the patchwork of laws in the U.S. that protect privacy. It’s based around the simplistic idea that a datum — such as a customer’s address — shouldn’t be shared with, say, a marketer without that user’s knowledge. Privacy is about protecting the address book, so to speak.

The rise of “predictive analytics,” though, has completely demolished such privacy legislation. Predictive analytics is a fuzzy term, but essentially means interpreting raw data and drawing new conclusions through inference. This is the story of the famous Target data crisis, where the retailer recommended pregnancy-related goods to women who had certain patterns of purchases. As Charles Duhigg explained at the time:

Many shoppers purchase soap and cotton balls, but when someone suddenly starts buying lots of scent-free soap and extra-big bags of cotton balls, in addition to hand sanitizers and washcloths, it signals they could be getting close to

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