GDPR

GDPR transformed the internet in 2018, and it’s not done yet

Time seems to work differently when you spend your days online. The memes, moments, and scandals that feel like ages ago are often really only months, weeks, or even days in the past — and what was once unthinkable quickly transforms into how it’s always been.  The General Data Protection Regulation, known as GDPR, only…


Time seems to work differently when you spend your days online. The memes, moments, and scandals that feel like ages ago are often really only months, weeks, or even days in the past — and what was once unthinkable quickly transforms into how it’s always been. 

The General Data Protection Regulation, known as GDPR, only went into effect on May 25 of 2018, but by now the regulation has reached so far into the everyday life of the internet that it’s becoming harder to imagine a time before. Things online are changing as a result of GDPR, even if you have to  to remind yourself of that fact, and as we move toward closing out 2018 it’s important to take a moment to explore just what those changes are — and the battle that’s still to come. 

For starters, it’s worth noting what GDPR even is. 

According to the European Commission, GDPR is “one set of data protection rules for all companies operating in the EU, wherever they are based.” The end result of this, we are told, is that “people have more control over their personal data,” and “businesses benefit from a level playing field.”

Sounds good, right? For the average internet user, that very much appears to be so. For example, GDPR dictates that companies must notify their users of data breaches that could affect said users. With huge breaches seemingly happening all the time, this requirement is vital when it comes to  ensuring that people are aware

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GDPR

French regulator fines Google $57 million for GDPR violations

Brace yourselves: The GDPR fines are coming.  France’s National Data Protection Commission (CNIL) has fined Google 50 million euros ($56.8 million) for breaching the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) rules, the regulator announced on Monday.  SEE ALSO: GDPR transformed the internet in 2018, and it’s not done yet After receiving complaints from two…


Brace yourselves: The GDPR fines are coming. 

France’s National Data Protection Commission (CNIL) has fined Google 50 million euros ($56.8 million) for breaching the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) rules, the regulator announced on Monday. 

After receiving complaints from two associations — None Of Your Business (NOYB) and La Quadrature du Net (LQDN), the CNIL found that Google has violated GDPR rules in two ways. 

First, the organization found that Google provided information to users in a non-transparent way. 

“Essential information, such as the data processing purposes, the data storage periods or the categories of personal data used for the ads personalization, are excessively disseminated across several documents, with buttons and links on which it is required to click to access complementary information. The relevant information is accessible after several

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GDPR

6 months post-GDPR – how has the industry changed?

The widespread usage of third party data allowed the digital advertising industry to view consumers as commodities to be traded and used for marketers’ own gain. But, GDPR looked like the ace in the hole that would change the status quo, and encourage advertisers and their partners to start taking consumer privacy concerns more seriously.…


The widespread usage of third party data allowed the digital advertising industry to view consumers as commodities to be traded and used for marketers’ own gain. But, GDPR looked like the ace in the hole that would change the status quo, and encourage advertisers and their partners to start taking consumer privacy concerns more seriously.  

But, as we pass the six month mark for GDPR, how far has the industry really come in that time, and are the regulations working as they were intended?

Putting customers first

From what I’ve seen, while the response from vendors on both the supply side and demand side has been mixed, the changes have been largely positive, for consumers and industry players alike. At the very least there has been a pause for thought on all sides of the advertising equation that has forced everyone to put the user experience at the centre of the discussion.

Crucially, from advertisers, we’ve seen a colossal effort to transform the way they identify and interact with consumers online, that is in line with their demands for fewer ads and more relevant content.   

Far from wasting time with opt-ins from users, advertisers have been investing in state-of-the-art tools that enable them to target the most relevant people, with the most relevant content in real time, shifting away from retrospective cookie-analysis toward a live real-time ‘in the moment’ style of targeting.  

(Image: © Image Credit: Devrimb / iStock

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GDPR

As the first fines fly, it’s time to rethink trust in a new, GDPR-era of data privacy

Six months have passed since GDPR was brought in to effect, but privacy remains at the forefront of the technology conversation. Take the Starwood Hotels and Resorts data breach, which may ultimately make brand owner Marriott the world’s first significant fine under GDPR.In light of such events, a special study in the UK and U.S.…


Six months have passed since GDPR was brought in to effect, but privacy remains at the forefront of the technology conversation. Take the Starwood Hotels and Resorts data breach, which may ultimately make brand owner Marriott the world’s first significant fine under GDPR.

In light of such events,a special study in the UK and U.S. set out to gauge how internet users in the UK and U.S. perceive their online footprint and current consumer sentiment towards the modern data privacy landscape.  

The study found that the last 12 months have had a profound impact on their perceptions with 72% in these markets stating they’re more aware of how companies collect and use their personal data than they were 12 months ago.

To not only retain customers’ trust, but also fundamentally remain competitive, companies need to take heed of new GDPR privacy rules and implement changes to data collection that are beneficial for everyone.      

(Image: © Image Credit: Xtock / Shutterstock )

Trust fundamental to competing effectively 

The majority of consumers in the UK and U.S. (64%) do believe sharing personal data online can be beneficial to them, and almost 2 in 3 recognize sharing personal data online is a necessary part of the modern digital landscape.  

When asked what would most motivate them to share their personal data with companies online, having trust in a company (53%) and having the ability to access and delete the data (46%) were the most important factors for consumers across all of the demographic breaks. But as many still don’t feel in control of their data online, companies that don’t demonstrate respect for personal information will soon lose credibility and stand out from those that do.

The GDPR mobilised companies all around the world

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Android, Antivirus, Apple, Crypto Currency, Enterprise, GDPR, Internet Security, iPhone, Mobile

10 Cyber Security trends to look out for in 2018

It is still too early to predict whether 2018 will be safer than 2017 when it comes to cybersecurity. It…

It is still too early to predict whether 2018 will be safer than 2017 when it comes to cybersecurity. It is fair enough to say that this question has been raised since last year wasn’t the best for many IT companies and global organizations. However, experts have already made a few predictions for 2018 based on the current cyber security trends. Let’s have a look at them one at a time:

 

1) A.I. Cybersecurity

Artificial intelligence has come a long way from where it once started. AI-powered programs today are capable of monitoring events which can help identify incoming cyber attacks. However, according to experts, cybersecurity AI may beat the purpose for what it is designed as it may be able to assist hackers in carrying out even more complex attacks. Some have even called them double-edged swords.

 

2) IoT (Internet of Things) with improved security features

Internet of Things, which is a growing topic of conversation today, is the correlation of computing devices with physical objects via the internet, such that they are able to send and receive data. From Apple Watches to Nest Thermostats, IoT will see a growth like never before with some professionals estimating over 20 billion connected units by the end of this year. If anything can cause an obstacle in this positive transformation, it would certainly be a collapse of security. After the massive amounts of DDoS attacks in 2017, security leaders have gotten a heads up about possible compromises through IoT devices. We certainly can expect a good amount of improved security features associated with IoT devices this year.

 

3) Biometric Authentication

Let’s face the truth! Usernames and Passwords suck! They are impersonal and put a burden on users in remembering them. With the introduction of fingerprint sensors on mobile phones and the huge success of Apple’s FaceID, we should expect more of biometric-enabled devices in the coming months. While it might be a little too early to expect biometric authentication in all our daily accounts, we might see a start of a new identity authentication evolution.

 

4) GDPR – General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

General Data Protection Regulation is probably something we haven’t heard till lately. GDPR is a set of regulations, expected to go into effect on May 25, 2018, that is intended to strengthen data protection for all individuals and businesses within the European Union. While its to early to predict anything, the GDPR is expected to have a significant influence on the digital sector of Europe.

 

5) Cyber attacks on global organizations

Mainframes are the backbone of most global organizations. These are the computers responsible for processing bulk data such as statistics, census, bank operations and ATM transactions. While security firms focus more on protecting mobile and computer systems, mainframes are being overlooked.

 

6) Cloud security

With the automotive industry recently joining the cloud family, providing users with state of the art navigation systems, it is predicted that there would be huge investments to secure the cloud environment. The priority would be to generate trust among cloud users to store data without hesitation on servers they don’t own.

 

7) Increase in Ransomware

Ransomware, as the name suggests, is a malicious virus where the victim’s access to information is blocked unless a ransom is paid. Typically, the ransom amount is in hundreds or thousands of dollars although sometimes even higher. Last year itself, there has been an increase of 36 percent of ransomware and the trend doesn’t seem to slow down. The Petya Ransomware that caused mayhem in almost all of Europe and other parts of the world in 2017 is a warning to expect more.

 

8) Cryptocurrencies and Blockchains

Cryptocurrencies have been an evolution. However, they do have certain drawbacks, especially when it comes to bitcoins. Since Bitcoin transactions do not require identity verification and can be done anonymously, they have fueled events of ransom threats like never before.

This is predicted to continue growing as we progress into 2018. Cryptocurrencies have been built around the concept of blockchains and this technology is just limited to them. While it is tough to predict what other implications blockchains might have on cybersecurity, some educated predictions say they could be used in decentralizing access control and improving identity management.

 

9) Threats to serverless apps

While serverless apps have some considerable advantages, they are potential threats to cyber-attacks, the reason being – the lack of servers. It might seem counter-intuitive at first as for the most part, the security of the serverless application is controlled by the customer itself. However, that isn’t always the best idea, as a users device might not always be the safest location to store important information.

 

10) Safer for everyone

2017 was a year when we experienced cyber attacks we have never seen before. Such events have pushed security experts to carry out careful investigations to make sure certain cybercrimes do not repeat. Governments and tech-firms have invested an immense amount of money to tackle a problem that caused more than $3 trillion of damages worldwide just last year. The increased amount of general awareness and the proper preparedness from various authorities should make the internet a much safer place for everyone.

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