GDPR

Why criminals spoof your domain name

To many people, online security requires nothing more than good antivirus software, perhaps along with anti-malware software and anti-ransomware software. However, as Adenike Cosgrove from Proofpoint explains, domain spoofing, phishing, and online fraud are becoming increasing problems.Cheap and easy domain registration, coupled with the introduction of new Top-Level Domains (TLDs), has led to a sharp…


To many people, online security requires nothing more thangood antivirus software, perhaps along withanti-malware softwareandanti-ransomware software. However, as Adenike Cosgrove from Proofpoint explains, domain spoofing, phishing, and online fraud are becoming increasing problems.

Cheap and easy domain registration, coupled with the introduction of new Top-Level Domains (TLDs), has led to a sharp increase in domain fraud. As attackers take advantage of this evolving domain landscape to target businesses and their customers, identifying and nullifying fraudulent domains is becoming progressively complex and the risk of email fraud continues to increase. 

As the legitimate domain universe has expanded, so too has the registration of their fraudulent counterparts. Total quarterly domain registrations rose 44% between Q1 and Q4 2018, with fraudulent registrations up 11% over the same period.

Such is the scale of the issue that 76% of organisations found lookalike domains posing as their own. A new tech-related TLD, .dev, launched in February of this year. Within two weeks, 30% of organisations found potentially fraudulent domains using it with their brand name. 

And attackers are not just increasing in number but in ingenuity too. There is no single smoking gun when it comes to spotting fraudulent domains. Attackers use a range of tactics, including:

  • TLD squatting – registering identical brand-owned domain names with different TLDs – .co instead of .com, for instance. 
  • Typosquatting – also known as URL hijacking, consists of registering sites close to someone else’s brand or copy

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GDPR

How to offer cyber security services

Cybersecurity is a primary consideration for the channel, and needs to look beyond basic security protection tools such as antivirus, malware protection, and anti-ransomware software. Despite this, there are still those that harbour distorted views on cybersecurity. Frequently, simply starting the conversation about providing cybersecurity can make channel organisations unfamiliar with it, feel very uneasy. Accumulated…


Cybersecurity is a primary consideration for the channel, and needs to look beyond basic security protection tools such as antivirus, malware protection, and anti-ransomware software. Despite this, there are still those that harbour distorted views on cybersecurity. Frequently, simply starting the conversation about providing cybersecurity can make channel organisations unfamiliar with it, feel very uneasy. 

Accumulated misconceptions have led to beliefs that providing cyber security is a job which requires reading high-level code, vigilante heroism and the task of taking on the world’s hackers and shut down ‘The Matrix.’ In reality, the only similarity to any sci-fi film is that reality is fairly dull in comparison. 

digital transformation. This means smaller businesses can now leverage data in the same way that only very large businesses could as recently as ten years ago. However, this exposes them to the same risks, but without the relevant infrastructure in place. 

This is why governments and regulatory bodies around the world have recognised a need to invest in cybersecurity.

Data protection laws

As of September 2019, over 80 countries and independent territories have now adopted comprehensive data protection laws to prohibit disclosure or misuse of information. In Europe, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and rules from industr

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GDPR

Cyber-security with intelligent network monitoring

Cyber-security has never been more important for enterprises. With regulations such as GDPR in force, falling victim to a breach can result in damaging financial consequences. As consumer awareness of data protection grows, many will stop doing business with a brand that’s suffered a breach. As a result, cyber-security spending has increased significantly, with Gartner…


Cyber-security has never been more important for enterprises. With regulations such as GDPR in force, falling victim to a breach can result in damaging financial consequences. As consumer awareness of data protection grows, many will stop doing business with a brand that’s suffered a breach. As a result, cyber-security spending has increased significantly, with Gartner predicting a 9% rise in 2019 compared to spending in 2018.

However, there were still a number of high-profile attacks in 2019, with 4.1 billion records exposed in the first half of the year. Worryingly, 3.2 billion of these records were exposed by just eight breaches, demonstrating how much damage a successful attack can cause. Big names were hit, including Capital One and Equifax, but smaller companies also suffered, with 32% of UK businesses identifying a cyber-security breach or attack according to DCMS’s Cyber-Security Breaches Survey 2019.

About the author

Ivan Blesa is Head of Product at Noble.

malware protection and antivirus software, as cyber-criminals become more adept at identifying and exploiting vulnerabilities in networks. At the same time, advances in technology, specifically deep learning, will arm businesses with new weapons to bolster their security infrastructure and stay secure in the fight against cyber-criminals. Here are three ways network monitoring will evolve in 2020.

Intelligent network m

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GDPR

Cyber threats set to increase in 2020

The cybersecurity firm FireEye has released its inaugural FireEye Cyber Trendscape Report, revealing that the majority (56%) of organizations believe that the risk of cyber threats will increase in 2020.To compile its report, the firm surveyed over 800 CISOs and other senior executives across North America, Europe and Asia to better understand their attitudes towards…


The cybersecurity firm FireEye has released its inaugural FireEye Cyber Trendscape Report, revealing that the majority (56%) of organizations believe that the risk of cyber threats will increase in 2020.

To compile its report, the firm surveyed over 800 CISOs and other senior executives across North America, Europe and Asia to better understand their attitudes towards some of the most prevalent topics in cybersecurity today.

Of those surveyed, half of global respondents (50%) said that their organization is not covered by cyber insurance. Germany had the second highest level of respondents without cyber insurance at 60 percent which is quite higher than in the UK (32%) and France (43%).

  • Closing the cybersecurity skills gap
  • Adopting AI: the new cybersecurity playbook
  • Digital transformation is putting security at risk

Fines stemming from compliance regulations such as GDPR were the second least chosen by respo

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GDPR

Privacy legislation perspectives in 2020

Internet security continues to be a key concern for consumers and business, especially when it comes to data protection. While the best antivirus software will often have privacy settings to help consumers better control what information is shared with companies, businesses themselves have more regulations to face in the coming years.The global privacy legislation landscape…


Internet security continues to be a key concern for consumers and business, especially when it comes to data protection. While the best antivirus software will often have privacy settings to help consumers better control what information is shared with companies, businesses themselves have more regulations to face in the coming years.

The global privacy legislation landscape has shifted considerably during 2019, and 2020 is going to be another busy year from a data protection standpoint. In fact, the start of the new year (1 January 2020) will see the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) enter into application. 

On Friday, October 11, 2019, Xavier Becerra, the California Governor signed all five of the California Consumer Privacy Act amendments that were awaiting his signature as well as an amendment to California’s data breach law. 

Attention is now being focused on draft regulations proposed by the California Attorney General. A period of public consultation, including several public hearings, will now take place up until 6 December 2019 and several proposals have already been tabled to make the legislation even stricter in 2020. This includes the Mactaggart ballot initiative, which proposes that a data protection authority be established in California to enforce the legislation on an ongoing basis. 

About the author

Paul Brietbarth is the Director of EU Operations & Strategy at Nymity.

Focus on consumer rights

While CCPA legislation may not be an omnibus style law like the GDPR, it has been inspired by it, particularly around data subject rights. The primary focus of the CCPA relates to individual consumer rights; the right to request information, right of deletion, right to opt-out of data being sold and obligations on businesses to inform consumers and employees of what personal data of theirs will be collected and for what purpose – at the ti

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