GDPR

Why criminals spoof your domain name

To many people, online security requires nothing more than good antivirus software, perhaps along with anti-malware software and anti-ransomware software. However, as Adenike Cosgrove from Proofpoint explains, domain spoofing, phishing, and online fraud are becoming increasing problems.Cheap and easy domain registration, coupled with the introduction of new Top-Level Domains (TLDs), has led to a sharp…


To many people, online security requires nothing more thangood antivirus software, perhaps along withanti-malware softwareandanti-ransomware software. However, as Adenike Cosgrove from Proofpoint explains, domain spoofing, phishing, and online fraud are becoming increasing problems.

Cheap and easy domain registration, coupled with the introduction of new Top-Level Domains (TLDs), has led to a sharp increase in domain fraud. As attackers take advantage of this evolving domain landscape to target businesses and their customers, identifying and nullifying fraudulent domains is becoming progressively complex and the risk of email fraud continues to increase. 

As the legitimate domain universe has expanded, so too has the registration of their fraudulent counterparts. Total quarterly domain registrations rose 44% between Q1 and Q4 2018, with fraudulent registrations up 11% over the same period.

Such is the scale of the issue that 76% of organisations found lookalike domains posing as their own. A new tech-related TLD, .dev, launched in February of this year. Within two weeks, 30% of organisations found potentially fraudulent domains using it with their brand name. 

And attackers are not just increasing in number but in ingenuity too. There is no single smoking gun when it comes to spotting fraudulent domains. Attackers use a range of tactics, including:

  • TLD squatting – registering identical brand-owned domain names with different TLDs – .co instead of .com, for instance. 
  • Typosquatting – also known as URL hijacking, consists of registering sites close to someone else’s brand or copy

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GDPR

Privacy watchdog accused of dragging feet over Facebook inquiry

The Irish Data Protection Commission has come under fire over the slow pace of issuing any significant fines against Facebook and its properties, WhatsApp and Instagram, over serious privacy violations.The criticism comes from noyb, a European non-profit cybersecurity enforcement platform, which has posted an open letter criticising the slow pace of the Irish authority.The news…

The Irish Data Protection Commission has come under fire over the slow pace of issuing any significant fines against Facebook and its properties, WhatsApp and Instagram, over serious privacy violations.

The criticism comes from noyb, a European non-profit cybersecurity enforcement platform, which has posted an open letter criticising the slow pace of the Irish authority.

The news coincides with the two-year anniversary of the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) being enacted by the EU. This empowered the European Commission to lev

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GDPR

Grandma ordered to delete Facebook photos of grandkids or face fine

Getting mad at your parents for posting photos of your kids seems reasonable. But not many people sue their mom and dad over it.  A woman in the Netherlands did just that and won thanks to the GDPR, the EU’s robust data privacy laws. A court in the Netherlands earlier this month in favor of…

Getting mad at your parents for posting photos of your kids seems reasonable. But not many people sue their mom and dad over it. 

A woman in the Netherlands did just that and won thanks to the GDPR, the EU’s robust data privacy laws.

A court in the Netherlands earlier this month in favor of a woman who was trying to get her mother to remove photos of her children from Facebook and Pinterest. 

For every day the grandmother didn’t remove the photos after the decision, the ruling stated she would be

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GDPR

Building transparency and customer confidence in AI

Are our bank accounts secure? Are our homes secure? Are our phone systems secure? These are all questions we ask ourselves on a daily basis and despite much wariness around the safety of technology, when we are in need of help about a delivery or service, we, without much question, hand over personal details to…

Are our bank accounts secure? Are our homes secure? Are our phone systems secure? These are all questions we ask ourselves on a daily basis and despite much wariness around the safety of technology, when we are in need of help about a delivery or service, we, without much question, hand over personal details to chatbots.

About the author

Ryan Lester, Senior Director, Customer Experience Technologies at LogMeIn.

Chatbots have been designed to make our lives a little easier, with simple verification questions they can answer common customer service inquiries without the need to sit on hold waiting for an agent. But with the rise of GDPR, it is important for organisations to communicate to customers how the data that we provide Artificial Intelligence (AI) driven chatbots is being used and stored. In this new era of chatbot technology and data regulations, businesses need to put themselves under the same scrutiny that customer and regulators will.

Transparency establishes trust

As businesses continue to discover new uses for AI-based technology the topic of ethics and transparency is becoming increasingly popular. Most organisations are using this technology to improve the user experience but for every ten examples of tech for good, there will always be someone looking to exploit the technology.

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GDPR

InCountry cashes in on growing demand for data residency services in Middle East

To cash in on the growing demand to address data sovereignty issues in the Middle East, San Francisco-based tech startup – InCountry – has opened its Middle East headquarters at Abu Dhabi’s Hub71.Samer Kamal, Vice-President of Product at InCountry, told TechRadar Middle East that data protection and data privacy have been hot topics globally for…

To cash in on the growing demand to address data sovereignty issues in the Middle East, San Francisco-based tech startup – InCountry – has opened its Middle East headquarters at Abu Dhabi’s Hub71.

Samer Kamal, Vice-President of Product at InCountry, told TechRadar Middle East that data protection and data privacy have been hot topics globally for enterprises as well as consumers.

The introduction of GDPR in 2018 has had a significant impact on personal data protection and the demand for privacy expertise exploded after that.

The rise of data breaches has forced many cloud providers to have data centres in each country to comply with data residency laws. 

More than 80 countries have now adopted comprehensive data protection laws.

 “Enterprises are expanding and going to more than one country and we help them comply with data residency regulations, especially in emerging countries. We have a data residency-as-a-service platform that securely stores and proc

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