GDPR

What’s been done for data privacy since GDPR?

This year, privacy continues to be the most important aspect of data management as an increasing number of consumers are growing concerned about their privacy and the security of their personal information. According to research from the Global Web Index, 51% of European respondents are concerned about the Internet eroding their personal privacy and 60% worry…


This year, privacy continues to be the most important aspect of data management as an increasing number of consumers are growing concerned about their privacy and the security of their personal information. 

According to research from the Global Web Index, 51% of European respondents are concerned about the Internet eroding their personal privacy and 60% worry about how their personal information is being used by companies. In the US, these figures rise to 62% and 65% respectively. While in Europe GDPR was introduced to protect consumers’ privacy and safeguard their data, it also seems to have increased awareness of the misuse of data. People now realise the importance and value of their personal information and, as a result, are demanding greater control over their information and increasingly becoming unwilling to give up that information.

While organisations already put processes in place to drive compliance with GDPR, those organisations must recognise and acknowledge this consumer trend and continue to enhance their processes and policies to sustain a data privacy program and ensure the proper protections and safeguards. Failing to do so could result in dire consequences, not only in terms of fines from regulatory agencies, but also failing to protect privacy and safeguard personal information, even slightly, could cost them the trust of their customers. 

  • Why data privacy without data visibility doesn’t cut it for GDPR
  • Ten tips for GDPR compliance
  • GDPR Subject Access Request: authentication cannot be an afterthought

Additionally, as companies come to grips with the privacy and security issues relating to personal information, the concept of information ethics is coming to the fore. So, what are businesses doing in order to provide for continuous improvement around the issue of privacy? And what does information ethics mean for data privacy?

Image credit: Shutterstock 

Image credit: Shutterstock 

(Image: © Wright Studio / Shutterstock)

Creating new roles

As businesses start to understand the idea of information ethics being a major corollary to data privacy and security, more and more organisations begin to look not only at what they could do with data but what they should do with data. And this should is not from the perspect

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GDPR

Data privacy regulators in GCC countries get more muscles to flex

Authorities in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries are looking to tighten their data privacy laws and give more teeth to regulators after the introduction of EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).Privacy regulations around the world protect the rights of the individual’s data for fair and lawful collection and use of their personal information by…


Authorities in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries are looking to tighten their data privacy laws and give more teeth to regulators after the introduction of EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Privacy regulations around the world protect the rights of the individual’s data for fair and lawful collection and use of their personal information by organisations.

Qatar launched its Privacy and Protection of Personal Data Law in 2016 while Bahrain implemented its data privacy law on August 1 this year. The UAE is expected to implement the law this year and Saudi Arabia by next year. The only countries left are Oman and Kuwait.

Phil Mennie, director for digital trust at consultancy firm PwC, said that the demand for privacy expertise exploded after the introduction of GDPR.

 “We are seeing a lot of changes across the GCC region and a lot of privacy laws are coming in,” he said.

“Large organisations are impacted by the GDPR but we observed, unlike in Europe where privacy has been a topic for a very long time, in the Middle E

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GDPR

Tackling 5G’s security challenges

About the authorBenoit Jouffrey is VP 5G Expertise at Gemalto, a Thales Company5G has tremendous potential to transform our lives, with the promise of enabling a truly connected world where smart cities, autonomous cars and smart factories are not just an aspirational concept but a reality. According to recent research from Ericsson, 5G will reach…


About the author

Benoit Jouffrey is VP 5G Expertise at Gemalto, a Thales Company

5G has tremendous potential to transform our lives, with the promise of enabling a truly connected world where smart cities, autonomous cars and smart factories are not just an aspirational concept but a reality. According to recent research from Ericsson, 5G will reach 40% population coverage and 1.5 billion subscriptions worldwide by 2024, making it the fastest mobile generation ever to be rolled out on a global scale. However, as history has taught us time and time again, any fast growth technology innovation creates new cyber security risks.

With billions of devices connected to the internet, we face an increased risk of cyberattacks, data privacy breaches and even state sponsored attacks. If we don’t get the security right, there’s a risk of undermining trust in the new wave of connected devices and the concept of the smart city and smart industry at large.

GDPR has shaped global data protection protocol, it will soon be accompanied by an even tougher framework called the ePrivacy Regulation (EPR). EPR will be enacted towards the end of 2019 and into 2020, and will require the pseudonymization and encryption of personal data as standard.

Increased attack surface:5G is transforming the key mobile and cloud functions of a network and is bringing new se

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GDPR

Marriott owner facing huge GDPR breach fine

The owner of the Marriott hotel chain is set to face a £99m fine following a data breach that left thousand of customer details exposed.The fine from the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) comes after the personal data of approximately 339 million guest records globally were breachedd following a cyberattack.Amazon Prime Day deals: see all…


The owner of the Marriott hotel chain is set to face a £99m fine following a data breach that left thousand of customer details exposed.

The fine from the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) comes after the personal data of approximately 339 million guest records globally were breachedd following a cyberattack.

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The breach was referred to the ICO by Marriott in November 2018 as around 30 million of those customers affected were residents of 31 countries in the European Economic Area (EEA) – and seven million related

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GDPR

Predicting the Future of Internet Privacy

About the authorBrett Dunst is the vice president of corporate communications at DreamHost.Every day, a new headline reminds us that keeping our online data private remains a constant struggle. Ongoing controversies involving Facebook and other social media sites only reinforce the point. It’s become depressingly common to hear of security breaches involving organizations who have…


About the author

Brett Dunst is the vice president of corporate communications at DreamHost.

Every day, a new headline reminds us that keeping our online data private remains a constant struggle. Ongoing controversies involving Facebook and other social media sites only reinforce the point. It’s become depressingly common to hear of security breaches involving organizations who have been given access to our personal data—organizations that we’ve often never even heard of before!

How did we get here? History shows that we’ve come a long way in a short time, and reminds us that we don’t lack for founding principles. History also reminds us that our attitudes toward online privacy and the ways we attempt to control it have evolved. So, where is the next evolution going to take us? We have some ideas.

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1) Encryption Will Become the New Normal

Encryption is an admittedly big tent. It encompasses everything from the hashing that safeguards passwords to the algorithms that guarantee the authenticity of digital signatures. Whatever form it takes, however, encryption represents the tech industry’s attempt to address the various issues clustering aro

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