GDPR

The encryption debate is at a dead end

This week marked the 11th annual Data Privacy Day initiative and TechRadar Pro is helping to improve data protection awareness with a series of articles exploring data privacy and how it impacts consumers and the businesses they interact with on a daily basis.Digital privacy debates continue to grow larger and more urgent. Governments worldwide strive…


This week marked the 11th annualData Privacy Dayinitiative and TechRadar Pro is helping to improve data protection awareness with a series of articles exploring data privacy and how it impacts consumers and the businesses they interact with on a daily basis.

Digital privacy debates continue to grow larger and more urgent. Governments worldwide strive to give people more power over their personal data, from the GDPR in Europe, to theCalifornian CCPA, and new data protection laws in Brazil.

These laws have caused confusion about different governments’ stance on encryption. The US government demanded access to Facebook’s encrypted Messenger last year for example, raising questions on whether they want these solutions to be more secure. Creating access through a ’backdoor’ into the messenger would provide a means for companies and governments to bypass encryption, but others could exploit this built-in weakness.

This runs contrary to the technologies companies are using to secure their sensitive data in light of legislation for data protection. One of the main tools being used to secure data in transit is end-to-end encryption (E2EE). Collaboration tools based on E2EE are replacing email in some companies, beside increased p

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GDPR

Data privacy: better the nanny state, the Wild West or a coalition of the willing?

After countless data breaches and scandals relating to major tech behemoths’ cavalier usage of our personal data, it would seem natural to assume that Brits have decided to police their own privacy with much greater intent. On the contrary, post-Cambridge Analytica and the #DeleteFacebook movement, UK user numbers have grown over the last year, passing…


After countless data breaches and scandals relating to major tech behemoths’ cavalier usage of our personal data, it would seem natural to assume that Brits have decided to police their own privacy with much greater intent. On the contrary, post-Cambridge Analytica and the #DeleteFacebook movement, UK user numbers have grown over the last year, passing 40 million for the first time (around 60 per cent of the UK population). 

Furthermore, the rate at which people accept default options and blindly accept T&Cs and privacy policies only increases as our digital lives become more cluttered. According to a survey by Deloitte, 90% of consumers accept legal terms and conditions without reading them.

If we can’t help ourselves as consumers, who will? 

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Consumer protections

Enter Her Majesty’s Government. It seems that various factions across Government have come to the conclusion, almost in unison, that greater consumer protections are needed. With GDPR still the soundtrack to last summer that’s ringing in our ears, a slew of Government activity is underway to crack down on big tech companies, and some is directed specifically at ensuring greater privacy protections. 

Recently, Jeremy Wright, the Digital secretary, unv

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GDPR

EMEA businesses ‘under constant cyberattack’

European businesses are facing more cyberattacks than ever before as criminals widen the reach of their assaults, new research has found.A wide-ranging report by NTT Security discovered that financial firms are seeing a particular rise in the threats they face, accounting for 30 percent of all attacks recorded on the continent last year. This was…


European businesses are facing more cyberattacks than ever before as criminals widen the reach of their assaults, new research has found.

A wide-ranging report by NTT Security discovered that financial firms are seeing a particular rise in the threats they face, accounting for 30 percent of all attacks recorded on the continent last year.

This was followed by the business and professional services sector (24 percent), technology (17 percent) and manufacturing (nine percent), with the finance industry also seeing a major increase in web atatcks, which grew from 22 percent to 43 percent.

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TechRadar Prowas invited to NTT Security’s Security Operations Centre (SOC) in Gothenburg to get a first look at the company’s 2019 Global Threat Intelligence Report (GTIR).

The 120-year-old company, which gets visibility over 40 percent of the world’s entire internet traffic to examine trillions of data logs worldwide ever year, sifting through billions of attacks, comprised its report to see which sectors are most at risk of attack.

The 20

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GDPR

GDPR Subject Access Request: authentication cannot be an afterthought

As the deadline approached last year, companies scrambled to update their data protection practices. As it happened, some companies did get fined for non-compliance. Following a long period of adjustment, however, GDPR requirements have become normalised into existing compliance programs.What many companies were ill-prepared for was the onslaught of consumers exercising their rights under the…


As the deadline approached last year, companies scrambled to update their data protection practices. As it happened, some companies did get fined for non-compliance. Following a long period of adjustment, however, GDPR requirements have become normalised into existing compliance programs.

What many companies were ill-prepared for was the onslaught of consumers exercising their rights under the new regime. Under GDPR, a consumer can file a Subject Access Request (SAR) with an organisation to determine if that organisation is processing personal data concerning him or her, and, if the information has been shared, along with the names of the parties with which it has been shared. 

In fact, these are only but a few of the searching questions that the user, as the data subject, can demand answers to. Further, once the SAR has been dispatched to the organisation, it is legally obligated to comply with the request, retrieve the information, and formally respond to the data subject – all within a month.  

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Subject Access Request

SARs hav

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GDPR

The majority of the EU just accepted controversial new online copyright laws

It was already something of a foregone conclusion, but Europe’s controversial new online copyright law took another step towards becoming official this week. The European Union announced on Monday that 19 of the 28 member nations in the European Council voted to pass the new Copyright Directive law. Italy and Poland were among those who…


It was already something of a foregone conclusion, but Europe’s controversial new online copyright law took another step towards becoming official this week.

The European Union announced on Monday that 19 of the 28 member nations in the European Council voted to pass the new Copyright Directive law. Italy and Poland were among those who voted in opposition to the bill, while Estonia, Belgium and Slovenia abstained.

Regardless, each EU member nation now has two years to start enforcing the law that some have said is tantamount to widespread internet censorship.

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