GDPR

Our contradictory relationship to data privacy

For some time now, governments have been blurring the lines between privacy and national security. In 2013, ex-CIA systems analyst Edward Snowden revealed that the NSA, a US intelligence agency, was collecting the phone records of tens of millions of Americans. As Snowden’s leaks continued, it soon transpired that as part of its Prism surveillance programme,…


For some time now, governments have been blurring the lines between privacy and national security. In 2013, ex-CIA systems analyst Edward Snowden revealed that the NSA, a US intelligence agency, was collecting the phone records of tens of millions of Americans. 

As Snowden’s leaks continued, it soon transpired that as part of its Prism surveillance programme, the NSA was tapping directly into the servers of nine internet firms including Facebook, Microsoft and Google to gather intelligence on Americans’ behaviour and interactions. What’s more, Snowden further revealed that the UK’s intelligence organisation, GCHQ, was also using Prism to gather similar information and was able to monitor up to 600 million communication a day.

Since then, the abuse and misuse of communications data are believed to have been instrumental in affecting the outcome of both the 2016 US presidential election and the Vote Leave Brexit campaign, and have been an important contributory factor in establishing stringent data privacy legislation such as GDPR. 

All of this is public knowledge. But despite the extensive column inches these stories have received, most have yet to change our habits, continuing to carry at least one device capable of listening to our conversations, broadcasting our exact locations, and tracking us as we move. And many of us willingly allow them to do so in trade-off for the convenience and benefits they offer. So just how concerned are we about the use and abuse of our personal data? 

  • Data Protection Day 2019: Privacy firmly in the limelight
  • How smart devices are leaving consumer privacy vulnerable
  • Is privacy the new customer experience grail?

Privacy, GDPR. General Data Protection Regulation. Cyber security and privacy concept. Wooden letters on the office desk, informative and communication background - Image

Image Credit: Shutterstock

(Image: © Image Credit: Shutterstock)

Signing away our privacy

Earlier this year, we conducted a survey of 4,000 consumers across the globe to measure their confidence in their own privacy and security practices, as well as those of businesses. The report, ’

Read More

Be the first to write a comment.

Leave a Reply

GDPR

Privacy watchdog accused of dragging feet over Facebook inquiry

The Irish Data Protection Commission has come under fire over the slow pace of issuing any significant fines against Facebook and its properties, WhatsApp and Instagram, over serious privacy violations.The criticism comes from noyb, a European non-profit cybersecurity enforcement platform, which has posted an open letter criticising the slow pace of the Irish authority.The news…

The Irish Data Protection Commission has come under fire over the slow pace of issuing any significant fines against Facebook and its properties, WhatsApp and Instagram, over serious privacy violations.

The criticism comes from noyb, a European non-profit cybersecurity enforcement platform, which has posted an open letter criticising the slow pace of the Irish authority.

The news coincides with the two-year anniversary of the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) being enacted by the EU. This empowered the European Commission to lev

Read More

Continue Reading
GDPR

Grandma ordered to delete Facebook photos of grandkids or face fine

Getting mad at your parents for posting photos of your kids seems reasonable. But not many people sue their mom and dad over it.  A woman in the Netherlands did just that and won thanks to the GDPR, the EU’s robust data privacy laws. A court in the Netherlands earlier this month in favor of…

Getting mad at your parents for posting photos of your kids seems reasonable. But not many people sue their mom and dad over it. 

A woman in the Netherlands did just that and won thanks to the GDPR, the EU’s robust data privacy laws.

A court in the Netherlands earlier this month in favor of a woman who was trying to get her mother to remove photos of her children from Facebook and Pinterest. 

For every day the grandmother didn’t remove the photos after the decision, the ruling stated she would be

Read More

Continue Reading
GDPR

Building transparency and customer confidence in AI

Are our bank accounts secure? Are our homes secure? Are our phone systems secure? These are all questions we ask ourselves on a daily basis and despite much wariness around the safety of technology, when we are in need of help about a delivery or service, we, without much question, hand over personal details to…

Are our bank accounts secure? Are our homes secure? Are our phone systems secure? These are all questions we ask ourselves on a daily basis and despite much wariness around the safety of technology, when we are in need of help about a delivery or service, we, without much question, hand over personal details to chatbots.

About the author

Ryan Lester, Senior Director, Customer Experience Technologies at LogMeIn.

Chatbots have been designed to make our lives a little easier, with simple verification questions they can answer common customer service inquiries without the need to sit on hold waiting for an agent. But with the rise of GDPR, it is important for organisations to communicate to customers how the data that we provide Artificial Intelligence (AI) driven chatbots is being used and stored. In this new era of chatbot technology and data regulations, businesses need to put themselves under the same scrutiny that customer and regulators will.

Transparency establishes trust

As businesses continue to discover new uses for AI-based technology the topic of ethics and transparency is becoming increasingly popular. Most organisations are using this technology to improve the user experience but for every ten examples of tech for good, there will always be someone looking to exploit the technology.

Read More

Continue Reading
GDPR

InCountry cashes in on growing demand for data residency services in Middle East

To cash in on the growing demand to address data sovereignty issues in the Middle East, San Francisco-based tech startup – InCountry – has opened its Middle East headquarters at Abu Dhabi’s Hub71.Samer Kamal, Vice-President of Product at InCountry, told TechRadar Middle East that data protection and data privacy have been hot topics globally for…

To cash in on the growing demand to address data sovereignty issues in the Middle East, San Francisco-based tech startup – InCountry – has opened its Middle East headquarters at Abu Dhabi’s Hub71.

Samer Kamal, Vice-President of Product at InCountry, told TechRadar Middle East that data protection and data privacy have been hot topics globally for enterprises as well as consumers.

The introduction of GDPR in 2018 has had a significant impact on personal data protection and the demand for privacy expertise exploded after that.

The rise of data breaches has forced many cloud providers to have data centres in each country to comply with data residency laws. 

More than 80 countries have now adopted comprehensive data protection laws.

 “Enterprises are expanding and going to more than one country and we help them comply with data residency regulations, especially in emerging countries. We have a data residency-as-a-service platform that securely stores and proc

Read More

Continue Reading