Antivirus, Apple, Enterprise, GDPR, Internet Security, OS X

OS X Security Tips

Besides growing speculations about Mac’s inbuilt security and the advent of various malware that were once non-existent on Apple’s computers,…

Besides growing speculations about Mac’s inbuilt security and the advent of various malware that were once non-existent on Apple’s computers, Mac OS X is still a respectably stable and secure operating system. While Apple tries its best in protecting you from viruses and other internet hazards, there are certain security elements that are just not in the vicinity of the operating system. Most of the time users tend to overlook these by trusting the OS more than its really capable of.

The Basics: 

Mac users should take some precautions and these are pretty straightforward. These include staying away from spam and phishing emails, disabling auto-login, creating strong passwords using password managers. In addition, installing applications only from trusted sources is also a good idea. And the most important of all is to keep your operating system and applications up to date. Other than that, Mac users who want to stay secure should follow the

Use a non-admin account for everyday tasks and disable auto-login:

Once you unbox a newly ordered Mac and proceed with setting it up, the first thing your device will ask you to do is set up a username and a password. This information is used to set up your initial user account. By default, the first user account is always the one with administrative rights and is known as the administrator account. This is where you would be able to install all your system files and perform various other unrestricted tasks. While an administrator account allows its owner to do almost everything he or she requires, the more often you use it, the more you are exposed to risks.

For common everyday tasks like surfing the web, watching a movie or listening to your favourite music, there is a much simpler and safer alternative – creating a standard account. Since standard users have limited rights, even if they make certain mistakes, they wouldn’t have to worry about the safety of their device.

Security and Privacy settings:

One of the first things to pay attention to after setting up your account is security and privacy settings. To access them, you’ll find a padlock at the bottom of the screen. Once you click it, it will ask you for your username and password. While there isn’t any perfect configuration, be cautious and set up the computer’s privacy according to your needs and preference.

Turn on firewall

Probably almost all of us have heard or read the word ‘firewall’ and that too not just once, though, only a few actually know what purpose it serves. Its function is simple and straightforward. It keeps you safe by blocking all unwanted internet connections while you are online. You might consider it to be enabled by default, however, it often isn’t.

Fortunately, it is pretty quick and easy to do that. While in the Security and Privacy settings we discussed earlier, click the Firewall tab in the system preferences. Locate the padlock on the bottom left side of the unlock system settings and click the button that says Turn on Firewall.

Use password managers:

While creating a strong and secure password is essential, the more complex they are, the easier it is to forget. Wouldn’t it be great if we had someone to constantly remind us of them? Well, there is good news! Password managers have made a lot of positive headlines lately and for sure, there is a big reason to love them, including not having to remember so many different, unique, complex passwords! Some of the most highly rated applications capable of storing passwords for the Mac OS X are LastPass and DataVault.

Use a VPN

You probably wouldn’t have to worry about using a VPN while you are online unless you have a habit of connecting to your neighbor’s Wi-Fi. However, if you are out with your MacBook and the only way of accessing the internet is through public Wi-Fi, consider using a VPN software. VPNs protect you from culprits trying to sniff data from people connected to the same network. This data may even include credit card numbers.

Avoid piracy

Installing illegal software might expose your information to a malware that might come along on the back of it. Even though OS X has always been the best at its game when it comes to defending the device from dangerous threats, it isn’t completely immune. Sticking to trusted sources for installing applications is the right way to go.

Additionally, most pirated software are shared through peer-to-peer platforms, which expose your information to everyone on the network, leading to potential unpleasant consequences.

Use antivirus

As mentioned earlier, a Mac doesn’t really require an antivirus as much as a Windows PC or laptop does. OS X is much more stable and secure than it is being speculated or criticized nowadays. However, there have been a good number of cases of the system being affected by malware and the numbers are still increasing.

Though, a home user wouldn’t require an antivirus as much as a business owner would, having one installed wouldn’t hurt. For more insight on this subject check out our article – Do I need an antivirus for OS X?

Keep your computer safe and install a tracker app

Last but not the least, never leave your MacBook unlocked or unattended. Macintosh laptops are expensive and are potential targets of thefts. Leaving them unlocked, might have daunting consequences.

Losing a MacBook is more than frustrating, having information exposed to the wrong people is a lot more distressing. Installing a tracker app might not necessarily get you your device back, however, it would certainly protect your data from reaching the wrong hands.

OS X Security Tips conclusion

Following the tips in this article should protect users from a wide range of potential OS X security threats. Browse rest of our articles for more advice on how to secure yourself online, from social media to your smartphone devices.

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Enterprise

Bots try to break the internet, and other trends for 2019

From the largest DDoS attacks ever seen and record-breaking numbers of data breaches, to the implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in May, 2018 will be remembered as an extraordinary year for the cybersecurity industry. With hackers developing increasingly sophisticated ways to attack enterprises every day, one of the most important lessons from this…


From the largest DDoS attacks ever seen and record-breaking numbers of data breaches, to the implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in May, 2018 will be remembered as an extraordinary year for the cybersecurity industry. 

With hackers developing increasingly sophisticated ways to attack enterprises every day, one of the most important lessons from this year is how crucial it is to stay one step ahead of cybercriminals at all times. In order to continuously protect company and customer data, businesses need to have an understanding of not only cybersecurity threats now, but also in the far future.  

Although no one can say for certain what 2019 will bring, we can look to the past to understand the trends of tomorrow. As technology has evolved, it’s been accompanied by smarter, more malicious and much harder to detect threats. With the ever-increasing intelligence of bots, the increasing complexity of clouds and rising IoT risks, as well as the impact of data regulations, cybersecurity will dominate boardroom conversations. 

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With this in mind, here are eight trends that will make the year ahead as turbulent as the one just passed:

Cyber-attacks will grow – and go slow 

Organisations will see an increase in cyberattacks but these will be “low and slow”, rather than “noisy” incidents such as DDoS attacks. Launched by botnets, “low and slow” attacks aim to remain under the radar for as long as possible, to steal as much data as they can. 

Often these take the form of credential stuffing attacks, where stolen credentials are used to access associated accounts and steal further personal data such as addresses and payment details. 

To protect themselves, businesses will need to adopt bot management solutions, which identify, categorise and respond to different bot types. The technology uses behaviour-based bot detection and continuous threat analysis to distinguish people from bots. 

Image Credit: iStockPhoto

Image Credit: iStockPhoto

Bots will overtake human web traffic 

As bots become more sophisticated, they will be responsible for more than 50% of web traffic. Already, Akamai has found that43% of all login attemptscome from malicious botnets – and this is set to increase as credential stuffing and “low and slow” attacks grow in popularity. 

More sophi

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GDPR

Data Protection Day: Spotlighting DNS for all the right reasons

January 28th has come and gone, leaving in its wake the ever-growing reminder of the importance of protecting personal information online. While it applies to both private citizens and corporate networks alike, Data Protection Day began in Europe to raise awareness on personal data privacy rights, and has deep undertones to businesses.  The effects of…


January 28th has come and gone, leaving in its wake the ever-growing reminder of the importance of protecting personal information online. While it applies to both private citizens and corporate networks alike, Data Protection Day began in Europe to raise awareness on personal data privacy rights, and has deep undertones to businesses.  

The effects of their non-compliance with GDPR regulations should begin to accelerate this year, with Gartner predicting upwards of a billion euros in issued sanctions by the end of 2021. This makes it even more important to keep security top-of-mindthroughoutthe year, particularly when it comes to backdoors into a network.

While most security tools block data transfer mechanisms like File Transfer Protocol (FTP), common internet protocol like the Domain Name System (DNS) are often left unsecured giving attackers a loophole; one where connections to arbitrary servers aren’t blocked. Hence, the DNS protocol is widely recognised as a prime target for data exfiltration. In astudy conducted in 2018, it was highlighted that 33% of companies were victims of data stolen via the DNS, so exfiltration via DNS has become a major concern to businesses in the midst of becoming compliant to data privacy laws.  

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GDPR

The ramifications of GDPR

It’s been hard to avoid, the implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has caused a stir amongst businesses. And nearly a year on, it remains in the front of our minds. The EU wide legislation has been seen as one of the most rigorous and ambitious data protection laws in the world, and many…


It’s been hard to avoid, the implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has caused a stir amongst businesses. And nearly a year on, it remains in the front of our minds. 

The EU wide legislation has been seen as one of the most rigorous and ambitious data protection laws in the world, and many countries are now trying to follow suit. It has already expanded to the USA (in California), India and Brazil, and other countries are expected to follow suit in the coming months. But, it shouldn’t be seen as an inconvenience for business, the regulations have the potential to transform how we engage with customers, and ultimately allow us to build trust.  

Many companies have struggled to navigate the regulations, with it being very difficult to understand what was required to ensure compliance. 

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Over the past year, areporthas shown that only 26 percent of UK businesses have successfully addressed data requests from individuals seeking to obtain a copy of their data within the one-month time limit required by GDPR. However, with Google’s record fine of £44 million following its breach of GDPR, ongoing coverage of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, and global Data Protection Day (January 28th) continuing to drive support for further data protection regulati

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GDPR

Google vs. GDPR: the ripple effect of the biggest data protection fine to date

It’s not the first time, nor will it be the last. On 21 January 2019, a business was found guilty of breaching the General Data Protect Regulation (GDPR) and now faces a financial penalty as a result. This is a similar story to what we’ve continually witnessed in the headlines since the implementation of GDPR…


It’s not the first time, nor will it be the last. On 21 January 2019, a business was found guilty of breaching the General Data Protect Regulation (GDPR) and now faces a financial penalty as a result. This is a similar story to what we’ve continually witnessed in the headlines since the implementation of GDPR in May 2018. So why is this case any different? This time, the business in question was Google.

The formula remains the same – company X breaches Y regulation and is therefore fined Z amount. But the fact of the matter is that, in this particular situation, it wasn’t just any company breaching GDPR. It was a tech giant, one whose name is synonymous with using data to provide us with information and optimise our experiences. And it’s not just a standard penalty – it’s £44 million. With such a huge organisation being fined an eye-watering sum of money, the question now isn’t simply what does this mean for Google – but what effect will this have globally?   

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Breaching GDPR

Since its inception in April 2016, GDPR has been the hot topic on almost all business agendas. With just over two years to identify, collate, and effectively store consumer data, businesse

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