GDPR

One year on, GDPR brings transparency to handling of personal data

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which is celebrating its first anniversary on May 25, 2019, has had a significant impact on personal data protection. All companies doing businesses with other companies located in the EU must comply with the law or face hefty fines.According to one of the rules, a company must…


The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which is celebrating its first anniversary on May 25, 2019, has had a significant impact on personal data protection. All companies doing businesses with other companies located in the EU must comply with the law or face hefty fines.

According to one of the rules, a company must reveal any known breach within 72 hours through proper channels or penalties for non-compliance could cost the organization upwards of €20 million or four per cent of its yearly worldwide revenue, whichever is higher.

Companies also need to demonstrate that they have proper controls in place for processing and security of personal data, including how data is used, stored, accessed, transferred and deleted.

What practical changes have been made in one year?

The reality is that most organizations have done the bare minimum when it comes to data handling and storage, Jasmit Sagoo, Senior Director for Northern Europe at Veritas Technologies, said.

“Generally, they’ve aimed to remove risks in two ways. First, deleting old data that is no longer necessary. Second, by taking steps to reduce the risk of litigation. This could be through consent forms on websites that ask customers

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GDPR

Privacy watchdog accused of dragging feet over Facebook inquiry

The Irish Data Protection Commission has come under fire over the slow pace of issuing any significant fines against Facebook and its properties, WhatsApp and Instagram, over serious privacy violations.The criticism comes from noyb, a European non-profit cybersecurity enforcement platform, which has posted an open letter criticising the slow pace of the Irish authority.The news…

The Irish Data Protection Commission has come under fire over the slow pace of issuing any significant fines against Facebook and its properties, WhatsApp and Instagram, over serious privacy violations.

The criticism comes from noyb, a European non-profit cybersecurity enforcement platform, which has posted an open letter criticising the slow pace of the Irish authority.

The news coincides with the two-year anniversary of the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) being enacted by the EU. This empowered the European Commission to lev

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GDPR

Grandma ordered to delete Facebook photos of grandkids or face fine

Getting mad at your parents for posting photos of your kids seems reasonable. But not many people sue their mom and dad over it.  A woman in the Netherlands did just that and won thanks to the GDPR, the EU’s robust data privacy laws. A court in the Netherlands earlier this month in favor of…

Getting mad at your parents for posting photos of your kids seems reasonable. But not many people sue their mom and dad over it. 

A woman in the Netherlands did just that and won thanks to the GDPR, the EU’s robust data privacy laws.

A court in the Netherlands earlier this month in favor of a woman who was trying to get her mother to remove photos of her children from Facebook and Pinterest. 

For every day the grandmother didn’t remove the photos after the decision, the ruling stated she would be

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GDPR

Building transparency and customer confidence in AI

Are our bank accounts secure? Are our homes secure? Are our phone systems secure? These are all questions we ask ourselves on a daily basis and despite much wariness around the safety of technology, when we are in need of help about a delivery or service, we, without much question, hand over personal details to…

Are our bank accounts secure? Are our homes secure? Are our phone systems secure? These are all questions we ask ourselves on a daily basis and despite much wariness around the safety of technology, when we are in need of help about a delivery or service, we, without much question, hand over personal details to chatbots.

About the author

Ryan Lester, Senior Director, Customer Experience Technologies at LogMeIn.

Chatbots have been designed to make our lives a little easier, with simple verification questions they can answer common customer service inquiries without the need to sit on hold waiting for an agent. But with the rise of GDPR, it is important for organisations to communicate to customers how the data that we provide Artificial Intelligence (AI) driven chatbots is being used and stored. In this new era of chatbot technology and data regulations, businesses need to put themselves under the same scrutiny that customer and regulators will.

Transparency establishes trust

As businesses continue to discover new uses for AI-based technology the topic of ethics and transparency is becoming increasingly popular. Most organisations are using this technology to improve the user experience but for every ten examples of tech for good, there will always be someone looking to exploit the technology.

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GDPR

InCountry cashes in on growing demand for data residency services in Middle East

To cash in on the growing demand to address data sovereignty issues in the Middle East, San Francisco-based tech startup – InCountry – has opened its Middle East headquarters at Abu Dhabi’s Hub71.Samer Kamal, Vice-President of Product at InCountry, told TechRadar Middle East that data protection and data privacy have been hot topics globally for…

To cash in on the growing demand to address data sovereignty issues in the Middle East, San Francisco-based tech startup – InCountry – has opened its Middle East headquarters at Abu Dhabi’s Hub71.

Samer Kamal, Vice-President of Product at InCountry, told TechRadar Middle East that data protection and data privacy have been hot topics globally for enterprises as well as consumers.

The introduction of GDPR in 2018 has had a significant impact on personal data protection and the demand for privacy expertise exploded after that.

The rise of data breaches has forced many cloud providers to have data centres in each country to comply with data residency laws. 

More than 80 countries have now adopted comprehensive data protection laws.

 “Enterprises are expanding and going to more than one country and we help them comply with data residency regulations, especially in emerging countries. We have a data residency-as-a-service platform that securely stores and proc

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