GDPR

How to fix the broken sales funnel

Business agility and the ability to respond fast to new sales opportunities has never been more important and a strong, intelligence-led sales model is essential to maximise opportunities. Yet in this post GDPR era, sales models have never been weaker or less efficient. A lack of data confidence is undermining outbound activity, leaving companies reliant…


Business agility and the ability to respond fast to new sales opportunities has never been more important and a strong, intelligence-led sales model is essential to maximise opportunities. Yet in this post GDPR era, sales models have never been weaker or less efficient. A lack of data confidence is undermining outbound activity, leaving companies reliant on increasingly expensive inbound campaigns that are not delivering.

To fix the broken sales funnel, organisations clearly need to use to fresh, accurate and GDPR compliant data. But that is just the start: successful sales activity is underpinned by a scientific, structured and metrics driven approach that leverages multi-dimensional real-time data.

  • Ensure data integrity by turning CRM usage into a game
  • Choosing the right data security solution for big data environments
  • Building reliable data pipelines with AI and DataOps

Science not art

Fewer good prospects. Delayed decision making. Ever lengthening sales cycles. A lack of predictability in the sales process. For many companies, the sales funnel is looking less than impressive. Yet while the temptation is to blame new restrictions of data privacy created by GDPR on the other, there is little value in playing the blame game. What companies require is a solution.

Where is the sales funnel broken and how can it be fixed? Understanding the ‘where’ is key – and something that far too many companies fail to address. How many good sales-people have been fired, when the problem was poor data? How much time has been wasted on prioritising the wrong prospects or failing to correctly identify the total addressable market?

A broken sales funnel cannot be repaired just by adding technology, replacing sal

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GDPR

Data privacy regulators in GCC countries get more muscles to flex

Authorities in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries are looking to tighten their data privacy laws and give more teeth to regulators after the introduction of EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).Privacy regulations around the world protect the rights of the individual’s data for fair and lawful collection and use of their personal information by…


Authorities in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries are looking to tighten their data privacy laws and give more teeth to regulators after the introduction of EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Privacy regulations around the world protect the rights of the individual’s data for fair and lawful collection and use of their personal information by organisations.

Qatar launched its Privacy and Protection of Personal Data Law in 2016 while Bahrain implemented its data privacy law on August 1 this year. The UAE is expected to implement the law this year and Saudi Arabia by next year. The only countries left are Oman and Kuwait.

Phil Mennie, director for digital trust at consultancy firm PwC, said that the demand for privacy expertise exploded after the introduction of GDPR.

 “We are seeing a lot of changes across the GCC region and a lot of privacy laws are coming in,” he said.

“Large organisations are impacted by the GDPR but we observed, unlike in Europe where privacy has been a topic for a very long time, in the Middle E

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GDPR

Tackling 5G’s security challenges

About the authorBenoit Jouffrey is VP 5G Expertise at Gemalto, a Thales Company5G has tremendous potential to transform our lives, with the promise of enabling a truly connected world where smart cities, autonomous cars and smart factories are not just an aspirational concept but a reality. According to recent research from Ericsson, 5G will reach…


About the author

Benoit Jouffrey is VP 5G Expertise at Gemalto, a Thales Company

5G has tremendous potential to transform our lives, with the promise of enabling a truly connected world where smart cities, autonomous cars and smart factories are not just an aspirational concept but a reality. According to recent research from Ericsson, 5G will reach 40% population coverage and 1.5 billion subscriptions worldwide by 2024, making it the fastest mobile generation ever to be rolled out on a global scale. However, as history has taught us time and time again, any fast growth technology innovation creates new cyber security risks.

With billions of devices connected to the internet, we face an increased risk of cyberattacks, data privacy breaches and even state sponsored attacks. If we don’t get the security right, there’s a risk of undermining trust in the new wave of connected devices and the concept of the smart city and smart industry at large.

GDPR has shaped global data protection protocol, it will soon be accompanied by an even tougher framework called the ePrivacy Regulation (EPR). EPR will be enacted towards the end of 2019 and into 2020, and will require the pseudonymization and encryption of personal data as standard.

Increased attack surface:5G is transforming the key mobile and cloud functions of a network and is bringing new se

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GDPR

Marriott owner facing huge GDPR breach fine

The owner of the Marriott hotel chain is set to face a £99m fine following a data breach that left thousand of customer details exposed.The fine from the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) comes after the personal data of approximately 339 million guest records globally were breachedd following a cyberattack.Amazon Prime Day deals: see all…


The owner of the Marriott hotel chain is set to face a £99m fine following a data breach that left thousand of customer details exposed.

The fine from the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) comes after the personal data of approximately 339 million guest records globally were breachedd following a cyberattack.

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The breach was referred to the ICO by Marriott in November 2018 as around 30 million of those customers affected were residents of 31 countries in the European Economic Area (EEA) – and seven million related

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GDPR

Predicting the Future of Internet Privacy

About the authorBrett Dunst is the vice president of corporate communications at DreamHost.Every day, a new headline reminds us that keeping our online data private remains a constant struggle. Ongoing controversies involving Facebook and other social media sites only reinforce the point. It’s become depressingly common to hear of security breaches involving organizations who have…


About the author

Brett Dunst is the vice president of corporate communications at DreamHost.

Every day, a new headline reminds us that keeping our online data private remains a constant struggle. Ongoing controversies involving Facebook and other social media sites only reinforce the point. It’s become depressingly common to hear of security breaches involving organizations who have been given access to our personal data—organizations that we’ve often never even heard of before!

How did we get here? History shows that we’ve come a long way in a short time, and reminds us that we don’t lack for founding principles. History also reminds us that our attitudes toward online privacy and the ways we attempt to control it have evolved. So, where is the next evolution going to take us? We have some ideas.

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1) Encryption Will Become the New Normal

Encryption is an admittedly big tent. It encompasses everything from the hashing that safeguards passwords to the algorithms that guarantee the authenticity of digital signatures. Whatever form it takes, however, encryption represents the tech industry’s attempt to address the various issues clustering aro

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