Microsoft

How to blur people’s faces in protest photos — and why you should do it

With mass protests taking place across the United States and abroad, social media safety is more important than ever. Enormous crowds of people are gathering in cities around the country to protest racism and police brutality in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota, last week. Photos and videos of…

With mass protests taking place across the United States and abroad, social media safety is more important than ever.

Enormous crowds of people are gathering in cities around the country to protest racism and police brutality in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota, last week. Photos and videos of these protests serve the very important purpose of documenting these actions as well as exposing police mistreatment of protestors. Posting them publicly, however, comes with its own risks.

For the safety of those involved, if you’re going to take photos at protests, you should consider blurring or pixelating the faces of those protesting before sharing them with the world. 

Thankfully, there are some easy ways to make this happen.

Why you should blur photos

In a word: Retaliation. It’s no secret that the federal government likes to surveil anti-racism protests through social media. The Intercept and Vice both reported on government monitoring of protest movements through social media after the killings of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and Freddie Gray in Baltimore, Maryland, respectively.

Buzzfeed News reported Tuesday that the DEA has been granted authority to collect intelligence on protestors during this current wave of uprisings, too. This is all to say that anyone who shows up to

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Microsoft

Now’s a good time to brush up on core digital skills like Excel

TL;DR: Work on your digital skills with the for $48.99, a 95% savings as of April 25.  There’s no need to force yourself to learn a new skill or get toned while in isolation. Full stop. However, if you’re getting sick of Netflix and social media and want to brush up on some core digital…

TL;DR: Work on your digital skills with the for $48.99, a 95% savings as of April 25. 


There’s no need to force yourself to learn a new skill or get toned while in isolation. Full stop.

However, if you’re getting sick of Netflix and social media and want to brush up on some core digital skills other than scrolling Instagram, we’ve got just the thing. Forget learning to code or design graphics. You can work on improving a digital skill you already have with this and set yourself up for a bigger paycheck when this quarantine is over. That’s right; your ticket to higher pay has been in front of you all along.

According to a report from Burning Glass, more than eight out of 10 positions require core digital skills like using Microsoft Excel. So going bey

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Microsoft

17 of the best Zoom memes that’ll make you laugh while working from home

There’s nothing quite so 2020 as Zoom memes. Sure, we’re all stuck inside and on endless video calls but, hey, at least we’re getting some internet content out of it! To be fair, Zoom memes are good mostly because it’s so much of reality these days. There are whole Facebook groups dedicated to the genre…

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There’s nothing quite so 2020 as Zoom memes. Sure, we’re all stuck inside and on endless video calls but, hey, at least we’re getting some internet content out of it!

To be fair, Zoom memes are good mostly because it’s so much of reality these days. There are whole Facebook groups dedicated to the genre and we at Mashable even went out of our way to gift you great backgrounds. 

Without further ado, here are 17 of our favorites.

1. Palpatine gets it

2. If you love The Office and I really, really do — this rules

3. Sure, why not? 

4. Got a point there…

5. Quality school

6. This one went super-viral but it’s worth revisiting because it’s great

7. I guess that’s one way to get through the day

8. Power move

9. Aaaaaaaaaaand done

10. Thought that was the right answer?

11. Impressive technical skill here

12. The invites aren’t always flooding in

13. Real

14. Fake freeze is kind of a good idea, though

15. A devastating blow to the ego

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16. True

17. Just masterful

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Microsoft

Bill Gates breaks down which coronavirus treatments he’s most hopeful about

Bill Gates has already pledged $250 million to the fight against coronavirus, and as he explained to Trevor Noah recently, his foundation is also funding various treatment research programs. So what progress has been made so far? In the interview above with Stephen Colbert, the Microsoft co-founder tells the Late Show host about the treatments…

Bill Gates has already pledged $250 million to the fight against coronavirus, and as he explained to Trevor Noah recently, his foundation is also funding various treatment research programs.

So what progress has been made so far?

In the interview above with Stephen Colbert, the Microsoft co-founder tells the Late Show host about the treatments that he believes are the most promising.

“There’s many that I’m very hopeful about,” Gates says. “The one that is maybe the most promising is taking the blood of recovered patients — the plasma — and then being able to put that back into people who have the disease. That has a reasonable chance of working, and in the next few months we’ll get data about that.”

Gates explains that the amount you need to give people is fairly small, as the plasma can be concentrated down.

“So even in developing countries this is innovation that could be scaled up and could work in a powerful way.”

Elsewhere, Gates also addresses testing capacity, lockdown measures, and the wild conspiracy theories about him on social media.

Uploads%252fstory%252fthumbnail%252f113827%252f8e57srca3src 2e65 438a bccc 1cedc23e57c4.jpg%252f41srcx23src  filters%253aquality%25288src%2529.jpg?signature=cfenix26xsrcutpmah3dfsmelor5o=&source=https%3a%2f%2fblueprint api production.s3.amazonawsArnold Schwarzenegger’s video chat with Jimmy Kimmel is derailed by a donkey and a tiny horse

Uploads%252fstory%252fthumbnail%252f11382src%252f9b25b751 52cc 45c1 8c25 src6c938f87b6f.png%252f41srcx23src  filters%253aquality%25288src%2529.png?signature=fa2lfdbzj1w fwzbghhadhwiyvu=&source=https%3a%2f%2fblueprint api production.s3.amazonawsStephen Colbert slams Trump for firing health expert who disagreed with him

Uploads%252fstory%252fthumbnail%252f113828%252ffb5src5cb6 9345 489d baec 5b5dabaesrc1a6.png%252f41srcx23src  filters%253aquality%25288src%2529.png?signature=lgw6bhu1fxswmsepcbia2gdtiuu=&source=https%3a%2f%2fblueprint api production.s3.amazonawsStanley Tucci teaches us to make a martini and he takes his ‘stirred not shaken’

Uploads%252fstory%252fthumbnail%252f113756%252f82a7f2f1 35d3 4f2f ae3b 5317368df8src2.png%252f41srcx23src  filters%253aquality%25288src%2529.png?signature=aderbqh6fke8ja85untivqcwwji=&source=https%3a%2f%2fblueprint api production.s3.amazonawsCoronavirus PSA meet

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Microsoft

Parents are exhausted trying to work and care for kids during the pandemic. Here’s what must change.

In normal times, parenting can be simultaneously rewarding and exhausting.  Moments of joy are followed by a meltdown, then tears, a hug, and snacks, which leads to quiet time and then play — intellectual, physical, or imaginary — when you marvel at your child, until it’s dinner time and they refuse to eat anything on…

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In normal times, parenting can be simultaneously rewarding and exhausting. 

Moments of joy are followed by a meltdown, then tears, a hug, and snacks, which leads to quiet time and then play — intellectual, physical, or imaginary — when you marvel at your child, until it’s dinner time and they refuse to eat anything on the table and become grouchy during bedtime until finally drifting off to sleep, but not before leaving their room to look for chapstick, use the bathroom, check on the dog, and sneak in one last hug. 

On good days, you go to bed feeling like a decent parent capable of mistakes but whose children are generally thriving. 

During the coronavirus pandemic, however, the typical ups and downs of childrearing are just the beginning. For parents working at home, without access to school or childcare, daily life is akin to household whiplash: Parents scramble to feed, entertain, discipline, and teach children while simultaneously meeting deadlines, sitting in Zoom calls, and trying their damndest to be productive. Sometimes the work happens at 6am or midnight. If you’re unlucky, sometimes the parenting happens at those exact times. 

If the widely shared social media posts and essays are any indication, people are grappling with this new reality as best they can, looking for inspiration — and chances to commiserate. Most parents are putting on a brave face because there appears to be no other option: To save lives, we must keep schools and daycare facilities shut down. 

There is another solution but it’s one parents don’t seem to be talking about collectively: Pressing elected officials to provide paid leave for every worker who’s at home caring for a child who otherwise would be with a paid caregiver, at daycare, or in school. 

Legislation passed last month gave that benefit to workers at companies with fewer than 500 employees, which left out millions of parents. Congress is considering expanding it to cover the majority of workers, according to advocates, and parents should pressure their representatives to ensure it’s in the next stimulus bill. The benefit would provide parents the reprieve they desperately want and need, because the bargain we’ve struck thus far isn’t sustainable. 

At the precise moment when parents are trying to remain valuable at work, in anticipation of pay cuts, furloughs, and layoffs, their children need a calming, engaged presence throughout the day. This would theoretically be manageable if it lasted just a few weeks. But in cities like San Francisco, New York, and Seattle, which have been shut down for a month and where school won’t reopen until the fall, parents expect at least a few grueling months of physical, mental, and emotional labor. Every day they must choose, multiple times, between their livelihood and their children. 

At the precise moment when parents are trying to remain valuable at work, their children need a calming

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