GDPR

Firms in EMEA take two days less than global average to detect a cyber incident

Organisations in Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) are two days better than the global average of 56 days to detect a cyber incident as organisations are detecting and containing attacks faster.In EMEA the median dwell time fell by 69.5% to 54 days in 2019 compared to 177 days in 2018.FireEye Mandiant M-Trends 2020 Report…

Organisations in Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) are two days better than the global average of 56 days to detect a cyber incident as organisations are detecting and containing attacks faster.

In EMEA the median dwell time fell by 69.5% to 54 days in 2019 compared to 177 days in 2018.

FireEye Mandiant M-Trends 2020 Report showed that organisations have put more emphasis on GDPR and increasing focus on security due to the ongoing challenges organisations face from sophisticated threat actors.

The global median dwell time decreased by 28% to 56 days in 2019 compared to 78 days last year.

Dwell time is calculated as the number of days an attacker is present in a victim network before they are detected. The median represents a value at the midpoint of a data set sorted by magnitude.

Internal detection, when an organisation independently discovers that it has been compromised, fell 40.6% to 30 days compared to 50.5 days in 2018 while external notification, when an outside entity informs an organisation that it has been compromised, also fell by 23.37% to 141 days compared to 184 days in 2018.

For the first time in four years, external notifications ex

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GDPR

Amazon Hit with Record EU Data Privacy Fine

Amazon has been hit with a record US$886.6 million European Union fine for processing personal data in violation of the bloc’s GDPR rules, as privacy regulators take a more aggressive position on enforcement.The Luxembourg National Commission for Data Protection imposed the fine on Amazon in a …

Amazon has been hit with a record US$886.6 million European Union fine for processing personal data in violation of the bloc’s GDPR rules, as privacy regulators take a more aggressive position on enforcement.The Luxembourg National Commission for Data Protection imposed the fine on Amazon in a …
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GDPR

Amazon fined $887 million for GDPR privacy violations

The Luxembourg National Commission for Data Protection made the decision on July 16.

The Luxembourg National Commission for Data Protection made the decision on July 16.
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GDPR

EU hits Amazon with record-breaking $887M GDPR fine over data misuse

Luxembourg’s National Commission for Data Protection (CNPD) has hit Amazon with a record-breaking €746 million ($887 million) GDPR fine over the way it uses customer data for targeted advertising purposes. Amazon disclosed the ruling in an SEC filing on Friday in which it slammed the decision as baseless and added that it intended to defend…

Luxembourg’s National Commission for Data Protection (CNPD) has hit Amazon with a record-breaking €746 million ($887 million) GDPR fine over the way it uses customer data for targeted advertising purposes.

Amazon disclosed the ruling in an SEC filing on Friday in which it slammed the decision as baseless and added that it intended to defend itself “vigorously in this matter.”

“Maintaining the security of our customers’ information and their trust are top priorities,” an Amazon spokesperson said in a statement. “There has been no data breach, and no customer data has been exposed to any third party. These facts are undisputed.

“We strongly disagree with the CNPD’s ruling, and we intend to appeal. The decision relating to how we show customers relevant advertising relies on subjective and untested interpretations of European privacy law, and the

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GDPR

WhatsApp privacy case must be decided in a month, EU watchdog says

The agency, which leads oversight of Facebook because the company’s European headquarters are based in Ireland, has been investigating WhatsApp to see if it complies with transparency obligations specified by EU privacy rules known as GDPR.

The agency, which leads oversight of Facebook because the company’s European headquarters are based in Ireland, has been investigating WhatsApp to see if it complies with transparency obligations specified by EU privacy rules known as GDPR.
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