GDPR

Firms in EMEA take two days less than global average to detect a cyber incident

Organisations in Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) are two days better than the global average of 56 days to detect a cyber incident as organisations are detecting and containing attacks faster.In EMEA the median dwell time fell by 69.5% to 54 days in 2019 compared to 177 days in 2018.FireEye Mandiant M-Trends 2020 Report…

Organisations in Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) are two days better than the global average of 56 days to detect a cyber incident as organisations are detecting and containing attacks faster.

In EMEA the median dwell time fell by 69.5% to 54 days in 2019 compared to 177 days in 2018.

FireEye Mandiant M-Trends 2020 Report showed that organisations have put more emphasis on GDPR and increasing focus on security due to the ongoing challenges organisations face from sophisticated threat actors.

The global median dwell time decreased by 28% to 56 days in 2019 compared to 78 days last year.

Dwell time is calculated as the number of days an attacker is present in a victim network before they are detected. The median represents a value at the midpoint of a data set sorted by magnitude.

Internal detection, when an organisation independently discovers that it has been compromised, fell 40.6% to 30 days compared to 50.5 days in 2018 while external notification, when an outside entity informs an organisation that it has been compromised, also fell by 23.37% to 141 days compared to 184 days in 2018.

For the first time in four years, external notifications ex

Read More

Be the first to write a comment.

Leave a Reply

GDPR

Why now is the time to decommission fingerprint scanners

Current security measures are urging us all to reassess everything that we touch amid the pandemic. Many businesses are managing to adhere to recommendations for their staff to work remotely, however there is also a large proportion of organisations having to stay open and active to serve our public. And these workplaces are finding themselves…

Current security measures are urging us all to reassess everything that we touch amid the pandemic. Many businesses are managing to adhere to recommendations for their staff to work remotely, however there is also a large proportion of organisations having to stay open and active to serve our public. And these workplaces are finding themselves having to disinfect pin pads and secure fingerprint readers on office doors or secure facilities, amongst other stringent hygiene policies. This uncertain time has made it clear that the access devices we all touch are actually a hindrance to the way we need to operate.

Before the pandemic even struck, businesses in the UK were spending more than two months resetting staff passwords and often employees were needing to remember a multitude of access and password codes for various operations. Of course, data and information protection is still important for all businesses today, thanks to the heavy fines given for GDPR breaches. On top of that, the rise of the ‘bring-your-own-device’ trend —which more than 46% of business have already adopted — has increased security risks and made corporate passwords not fit for purpose.

So, a more secure solution to workplace access is needed. Gartner predicts that by 2022, 40 perce

Read More

Continue Reading
GDPR

Keeping your business fully compliant and secure during the delay phase

The UK is in the delay phase of the pandemic, with schools closed and employees asked to work from home where possible. So, how do businesses remain data compliant and cyber secure with staff working remotely, some for the first time?Firstly, rate the risks that remote working poses through a quick risk and security audit,…

The UK is in the delay phase of the pandemic, with schools closed and employees asked to work from home where possible. So, how do businesses remain data compliant and cyber secure with staff working remotely, some for the first time?

Firstly, rate the risks that remote working poses through a quick risk and security audit, which can be done whether employees are already working from home or not.

email as their main source of communications leaves them more vulnerable to phishing and social engineering attacks.

Identify and rate these risks on your most important assets and agree the best approach to deal with them. Getting key stakeholders from all areas of the business involved in these conversations is key as different areas of the business will have unique perspectives, based on their data, systems and way of working. Then, start implementing effective security measures starting with data protection.

  • Here’s our list of the best antivirus services on the market
  • Working from home: the mouse, monitor, keyboard and router you need
  • Here’s our choice of the best VPN services of 2020

Preventing a data leak

Legal and regulatory data protection and compliance worldwide is more stringent than ever, and the mishandling of i

Read More

Continue Reading
GDPR

Enterprise security in 2020: it takes a village of experts

Over the last few years, the enterprise security landscape has drastically changed. In 2019 alone more than half of British businesses fell victim to malware and cyber-attacks – an increase of 40% when compared to the previous year – with average losses soaring from $229,000 (£176,000) to $369,000 (roughly £283,519). The rapid adoption of digital technologies…

Over the last few years, the enterprise security landscape has drastically changed. In 2019 alone more than half of British businesses fell victim to malware and cyber-attacks – an increase of 40% when compared to the previous year – with average losses soaring from $229,000 (£176,000) to $369,000 (roughly £283,519). 

The rapid adoption of digital technologies and the vast amount of data that is gathered by them means that every corner of a business needs constant monitoring and protection. Managing this task is even more challenging due to regulatory mandates such as the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS).

About the author

Hope Swancy-Haslam, Sr. Director, OpenText.

cybersecurity budgets either stay the same or decrease over the last twelve months. On top of all this is the growing shortage of skilled, knowledgeable information security professionals. 

The convergence of these issues for the enterprise will make the challenge of responding to the thousands upon thou

Read More

Continue Reading
GDPR

UK Home Office ‘repeatedly breached GDPR’

The UK Home Office breached GPDR at least 100 times when dealing with applications for residency rights as part of the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS).According to a report from David Bolt, the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration (ICIBI), significant and manifold breaches of the data protection regulation occurred as part of the vetting…

The UK Home Office breached GPDR at least 100 times when dealing with applications for residency rights as part of the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS).

According to a report from David Bolt, the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration (ICIBI), significant and manifold breaches of the data protection regulation occurred as part of the vetting process.

UK Google users to lose EU data protection

  • What is GDPR? Everything yo
  • Read More

    Continue Reading