GDPR

Data privacy: will it be as in vogue as it was in 2018?

The summer of 2018 saw England almost ‘bring football home’ (and I emphasise ‘almost’ as a proud citizen of Paris), the marriage between Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, the Irish Referendum and the longest total lunar eclipse of the 21st century. It was also the summer GDPR was bigger than Beyoncé, according to Google.   Platforms…


The summer of 2018 saw England almost ‘bring football home’ (and I emphasise ‘almost’ as a proud citizen of Paris), the marriage between Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, the Irish Referendum and the longest total lunar eclipse of the 21st century. It was also the summer GDPR was bigger than Beyoncé, according to Google.   

Platforms such as Facebook were held accountable for their data practices globally, and companies finally woke up to the fact that they had to adapt to GDPR’s new rules, to ensure compliance with the new European regulation.

Whilst, to the football fan or loyal monarchist, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) may not have been as exciting as some of the big events that complemented the UK’s heatwave, the lasting impact of GDPR on consumer’s day-to-day lives far outweighs that of the others.

  • Majority of companies still aren’t GDPR-compliant
  • Data Privacy is having its day
  • Here is the one reason why companies are getting data protection wrong

The significance of this European regulation has already been huge. We’ve seen the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) enforce fines to the big players, making an example of them so all businesses realise the seriousness of breaching the rules.

With so much achieved in 2018, it begs the question: what can we expect from 2019 and the plight of data? Will this year continue to be as pivotal for the battle for consumer privacy rights and what does GDPR still have yet to achieve? 

E-receipts show that GDPR might still need to solidify its celebrity status 

In January, we once again saw Data Protection Day, an international holiday to raise awareness and promote privacy and data protection best practices. Whilst this day does so much to keep these topics within the mainstream agenda and at the forefront of people’s minds, there is still quite far to go as GDPR becomes the new normal. Already, regulators are keeping a close eye on some industries that are going throu

Read More

Be the first to write a comment.

Leave a Reply

GDPR

Marriott owner facing huge GDPR breach fine

The owner of the Marriott hotel chain is set to face a £99m fine following a data breach that left thousand of customer details exposed.The fine from the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) comes after the personal data of approximately 339 million guest records globally were breachedd following a cyberattack.Amazon Prime Day deals: see all…


The owner of the Marriott hotel chain is set to face a £99m fine following a data breach that left thousand of customer details exposed.

The fine from the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) comes after the personal data of approximately 339 million guest records globally were breachedd following a cyberattack.

Amazon Prime Day deals: see all the best early offers right here.

The breach was referred to the ICO by Marriott in November 2018 as around 30 million of those customers affected were residents of 31 countries in the European Economic Area (EEA) – and seven million related

Read More

Continue Reading
GDPR

Predicting the Future of Internet Privacy

About the authorBrett Dunst is the vice president of corporate communications at DreamHost.Every day, a new headline reminds us that keeping our online data private remains a constant struggle. Ongoing controversies involving Facebook and other social media sites only reinforce the point. It’s become depressingly common to hear of security breaches involving organizations who have…


About the author

Brett Dunst is the vice president of corporate communications at DreamHost.

Every day, a new headline reminds us that keeping our online data private remains a constant struggle. Ongoing controversies involving Facebook and other social media sites only reinforce the point. It’s become depressingly common to hear of security breaches involving organizations who have been given access to our personal data—organizations that we’ve often never even heard of before!

How did we get here? History shows that we’ve come a long way in a short time, and reminds us that we don’t lack for founding principles. History also reminds us that our attitudes toward online privacy and the ways we attempt to control it have evolved. So, where is the next evolution going to take us? We have some ideas.

Amazon Prime Day deals: see all the best early offers right here.

1) Encryption Will Become the New Normal

Encryption is an admittedly big tent. It encompasses everything from the hashing that safeguards passwords to the algorithms that guarantee the authenticity of digital signatures. Whatever form it takes, however, encryption represents the tech industry’s attempt to address the various issues clustering aro

Read More

Continue Reading
GDPR

UAE data protection law, similar to GDPR, likely landing this year

The UAE is looking at implementing a data protection law, similar to EU’s introduction of General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in 2008, as part of the UAE National Cybersecurity Strategy.TRA has launched the 2020-2025 strategy as the country is entering the fifth-generation era in a bid to enable swift and coordinated response to cyber incidents…


The UAE is looking at implementing a data protection law, similar to EU’s introduction of General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in 2008, as part of the UAE National Cybersecurity Strategy.

TRA has launched the 2020-2025 strategy as the country is entering the fifth-generation era in a bid to enable swift and coordinated response to cyber incidents in the UAE.  “Part of the strategy is that data privacy is crucial to the cyber and the UAE is regulating and drafting a data protection law. We will look at the best performing practices performed worldwide; GDPR will be one of the inputs to it. We want to make sure that whatever regulations are put, are easy to be implemented across different sectors,” Mohammad Al Zarooni, Director of Policies and Programs Department at Telecommunications Regulatory Authority (TRA) of the UAE,told TechRadar Middle East, at an event.

Read More

Continue Reading
GDPR

Security is now a board level issue: how to secure the data supply chain

It has never been more crucial for businesses to implement and demonstrate their commitment to cybersecurity; with data increasingly being used to make significant business decisions. While historically, the major concerns for senior management around IT security have focused on intellectual property theft and reputational risk, ongoing changes in technology and politics have changed today’s business…


It has never been more crucial for businesses to implement and demonstrate their commitment to cybersecurity; with data increasingly being used to make significant business decisions. 

While historically, the major concerns for senior management around IT security have focused on intellectual property theft and reputational risk, ongoing changes in technology and politics have changed today’s business landscape and priorities significantly. With GDPR now in full force, organisations must demonstrate to stakeholders that they are making a credible effort to ensure that security is built into the heart of business operations. 

IT security budgets are falling

  • Half of organizations lack the security talent needed to remain secure
  • Empowering CISOs to strengthen password security
  • Vulnerabilities in the data supply chain

    Organisations must first understand what potential vulnerabilities look like within a data supply chain, so they can be recognised and mitigated. As cyberattacks increase in sophistication, they are likely to be so subtle that they don’t visibly impact a system; providing misleading information to force erroneous decisions. Ironically, whilst this type of attack will be very difficult to detect, early identification is vital in order to prevent significant damage.

    The first

    Read More

    Continue Reading