Enterprise

Dangerous new malware infects thousands of enterprise devices

Thousands of enterprise devices around the world are being targeted by a new malware campaign dubbed Blue Mockingbird. Once infected, this malware downloads and installs additional payloads that use the device to mine Monero cryptocurrency, which is then sent to the hackers.Microsoft and Intel are turning malware into images”Corona antivirus” infects victims with malwareBox boosts malware…

Thousands of enterprise devices around the world are being targeted by a new malware campaign dubbed Blue Mockingbird. 

Once infected, this malware downloads and installs additional payloads that use the device to mine Monero cryptocurrency, which is then sent to the hackers.

Microsoft and Intel are turning malware into images

  • “Corona antivirus” infects victims with malware
  • Box boosts malware detection to help remote workers
  • Once the hackers get access t

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    Enterprise

    Avast Business Antivirus Pro Plus

    Avast has three products for its business users, and Avast Business Antivirus Pro Plus (ABAPP) is the company’s top-tier endpoint protection product that does a lot more than just flagging malicious activity.FeaturesAvast classifies a majority of its functions as shields. For instance, there’s the FileShield that scans files, email attachments and even URLs to thwart…

    Avast has three products for its business users, and Avast Business Antivirus Pro Plus (ABAPP) is the company’s top-tier endpoint protection product that does a lot more than just flagging malicious activity.

    Features

    Avast classifies a majority of its functions as shields. For instance, there’s the FileShield that scans files, email attachments and even URLs to thwart malware, spyware, and ransomware. This is best used in conjunction with BehaviourShield, which looks for suspicious activity in otherwise innocuous-looking apps, in a bid to catch deep-rooted malware. There’s also the WebShield that prevents you from visiting malicious websites. 

    Besides these usual antivirus and anti-malware functions, you get several other useful features as well. If Avast isn’t able to automatically classify a download, it’ll send it to Avast HQ for analysis. There’s also a secure password manager that comes with an add-on for Firefox, as well as a customizable software firewall, and a WiFi inspector to find and fix vulnerabilities in your network.

    Avast Business Antivirus Pro Plus 2

    (Image credit: Avast)

    And that’s not all. In addition to the security features, the platform also helps you protect your privacy. There’s Browser Reset that not only deletes your browser cache, but also gets rid of any harmful plugins. All endpoints also get a data shredder to ensure all deleted files are irrecoverable even when using forensic data carving utilities. Also of note is the WebCam shield that alerts you whenever an app tries to use your webcam. 

    virtual private network (VPN) service that the endpoints can use to camouflage themselves online, perhaps to remain anonymous, or to circumvent IP or geo-blocks. 

    While all these features are included in ABAPP, there are some like patch management for Windows devices, that is also available as an optional add-on.

    Avast Business Antivirus Pro Plus 3

    (Image credit: Avast )

    Interface and use

    The primary interface for interacting with the platform is the Avast Business Cloud Console. As the name suggests, it’s a remote web-based interface for managing your endpoints. 

    The landing dashboard of the interface gives you a quick overview of the alerts on your devices. Once you’ve added devices, you can use this dashboard to drill down and investigate any of the alerts in detail or even create remote scanning tasks. The dashboard also displays a trend line for threats detected in your network. 

    The first order of business is to install the Avast agent on your endpoints in the network. For this, you can use the Add new device button in the Dashboard or head to the Devices section and click the + button. The console offers you a couple of options to deploy endpoints. You can either download the installers or email the download link to install the Avast client manually. 

    Or, if you have an Active Directory server on your network, you can hook it up with the Cloud Console by specifying the credentials for the directory server. Avast will scan your network and guide you through a four-step process to install the agent on the endpoints.

    Avast Business Antivirus Pro Plus 4

    (Image credit: Avast)

    The endpoint agent will install the Avast app that you can use to run scans manually, and tweak the protection settings of the endpoint, as well as access the various security and privacy tools.

    After you’ve deployed the endpoints, allow Avast to scan the computers. Soon the Devices page will display details regarding any detected threats. Some of them would have been dealt with automatically, while others might require intervention on your part, and will be flagged as such.

    For more details, you can click on any of the endpoints. Here you’ll be able to view the name of the detected threats, along with Shield that picked them up, and the action taken. 

    You can also remotely create scann

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    Enterprise

    Amazon wants to get UK startups up and running online

    Amazon has launched a new initiative aimed at helped British startups and small businesses get up to speed.The Amazon Small Business Accelerator looks to help enterprises that may have seen their growth stymied by the global pandemic, and help them regain this momentum.Amazon Prime Day 2020 UK: potential deals and postponed September dateAmazon wants to…

    Amazon has launched a new initiative aimed at helped British startups and small businesses get up to speed.

    The Amazon Small Business Accelerator looks to help enterprises that may have seen their growth stymied by the global pandemic, and help them regain this momentum.

    Amazon Prime Day 2020 UK: potential deals and postponed September date

  • Amazon wants to make enterprise data search simpler than ever before
  • Best cloud antivirus: top business security software to stop cyber attacks
  • Amazon UK startuos

    Launched in pa

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    Enterprise

    WorldVPN

    WorldVPN is a small provider who claims to offer an ‘enterprise VPN’ from as little as $1.12 a month over three years.’Enterprise’ is a serious exaggeration, but the company’s 200+ locations across 30+ countries isn’t bad. P2P is supported on some servers, too.ExpressVPN or NordVPN, then this really isn’t in the same league.Want to try…

    WorldVPN is a small provider who claims to offer an ‘enterprise VPN’ from as little as $1.12 a month over three years.

    ‘Enterprise’ is a serious exaggeration, but the company’s 200+ locations across 30+ countries isn’t bad. P2P is supported on some servers, too.

    ExpressVPN or NordVPN, then this really isn’t in the same league.

    • Want to try WorldVPN? Check out the website here

    The company scores zero for transparency, with no details on who owns it or where it’s based, no terms and conditions page, and a ‘no logging’ promise with absolutely no details to back it up. (It’s even contradicted by WorldVPN’s site, where your account page displays the amount of data you’ve transferred.)

    Support is unimpressive with only 22 articles in a tiny web knowledgebase, a ‘News’ page which hasn’t been updated in more than three years, and what looks like Live Chat, but turns out to be a ‘Leave a message’ system, essentially no different to sending an email.

    Plans and pricing

    WorldVPN’s appeal is mostly based on price. Okay, pretty much entirely, but when you look at the details, it’s hard not to be tempted.

    The ‘One User’ plan supports only a single connection, for instance, but it’s yours for $1.99 billed monthly. Yes, that’s real ‘monthly billing’, not ‘the equivalent if you pay for three years up-front.’ Opt for the annual plan and this drops to $1.58.

    The Budget plan gets you support for three connections from $3.45 billed monthly, or $1.70 over a year.

    The Unlimited plan – which, despite the name, only supports five simultaneous connections – is a reasonable $6.95 billed monthly, $3.50 over a year.

    Dedicated IPs get you a fresh IP address for your usage alone, which should make it easier to bypass VPN blocking and get into sites like Netflix. These are priced from $10 a month in some US cities, and you can choose multiple other regions for a little more: UK, Sweden, Russia, Japan, India and more cost $13 a month; Taiwan, Malaysia and Hong Kong cost $18 a month, and so on.

    WorldVPN also has a Reseller scheme which could work for regular users, too. 

    For example, a one-off $100 gets you 100 months of use across as many plans as you need, each one supporting up to three simultaneous connections. You could use it for yourself in a single block, in which case you’re covered for more than eight years. You could share it with family or across a business, enabling everyone to get connected. And if someone only needs a VPN occasionally – three months a year to watch a particular show on Netflix, say – then you only need allocate them three months from your total, which may save you even more cash.

    WorldVPN’s service looks extremely basic, then, but at least it’s priced to match, and there’s certainly a lot of flexibility here.

    Website

    WorldVPN’s website has some problems (Image credit: WorldVPN)

    Signing up

    WorldVPN has a lot of plans, as we’ve seen, but its pricing page highlights the key differences and makes it easy to find what you need.

    The company does hide one detail on the purchase page, and it’s easy to see why. Although WorldVPN supports many payments methods, everything but Bitcoin has a processing fee: 3% for Perfect Money, 5% plus $0.95 for cards or PayPal, and 5% for WebMoney, QIWI, MOLPay, AdvCash and Yandex Money.

    If you were hoping to pay monthly via PayPal, say, that makes a major difference. An initial $1.99 a month becomes $3.04, for instance – a 50% price hike on what you were hoping to pay.

    If you’re paying annually, though, it’s not such a big deal, and overall WorldVPN remains significantly cheaper than most of the competition.

    Whatever plan or subscription length you decide you need, the payment process is straightforward, and a few minutes after we’d made our choice, WorldVPN sent us an email with account credentials and links to various setup tutorials.

    Windows App

    This is the user interface of WorldVPN’s Windows app (Image credit: WorldVPN)

    Windows app

    Some VPN apps focus on ease of use, others on power, but WorldVPN manages to fail in both areas: it looks complicated and intimidating, yet has barely any features at all.

    The text-heavy tabbed interface wastes screen real estate, for example by having a login area on the main dashboard. There’s no need to see your username and password once you’ve logged in.

    The app doesn’t have an ‘Automatic’ option to choose the fastest server for you, forcing you to manually choose your preferred location each time. (There’s no Favorites system or Recent Servers list to speed this up.)

    Protocol support is limited to OpenConnect, OpenVPN UDP and OpenVPN TCP. There’s no support for L2TP, IKEv2 or any native Windows protocols. And there’s no Settings panel, either, no interface or connection tweaks at all.

    There’s no thought for usability. Whatever location and protocol you’d selected when you last used the app, disappears when you close and restart it, forcing you to choose them again.

    The only significant feature is the kill switch. It’s application-based rather than system-wide, forcing you to create and maintain a list of applications that should be forcibly closed if the VPN drops. It’s better than nothing, but only just.

    Locations

    Server locations are presented in a list as opposed to on a map (Image credit: WorldVPN)

    Windows testing

    The app got off to a bad start with a number of clumsy mistakes. On launch the app prompted us to choose a server, but you’re able to ignore that, click Connect anyway, and watch as it hangs for minutes; our ‘Account Info’ page showed our ‘Expirity Date’ as 1970-01-01 for us, presumably because we were using a trial and it didn’t have one; there are four links to key WorldVPN system areas, but two of them are dead.

    Protocols

    You won’t find support for WireGuard and other VPN protocols here (Image credit: WorldVPN)

    The Windows app only supports three protocols – OpenConnect, OpenVPN UDP and OpenVPN TCP – and the first not only didn’t connect, but it didn’t give us any explanation of why; it just hung on ‘Connecting…’ There’s no Cancel button, so when we got bored, we tapped Disconnect. 

    The app hung again, and so we tried forcibly closing the process. But then it wouldn’t relaunch, complaining it was running already. 

    Sometimes, when the app had hung for a few minutes on ‘Connecting…’, we clicked Disconnect and were prompted for our password, even though we’d already logged in. When we entered our password, despite just clicking Disconnect, the app finally connected us.

    On other occasions, the app seemed to leave such a mess behind that we needed to reboot our system before it would connect again. 

    We took a closer look at what was happening in the background and found the app was pinging remote IP addresses, but not by using its own code; it was repeatedly launching Windows’ own ping.exe, maybe once or twice a second. That was generating a vast amount of CPU usage on our test system, up to 15%, a significant waste of energy and resources that is totally unnecessary. 

    Connection Error

    This is not the kind of connection error you want to see when using a VPN (Image credit: WorldVPN)

    When we did finally connect to one UK server, the app warned us: ‘You are connecting for the first time to this peer. You have no guarantee that the server is the computer you think it is’, and asked us to confirm that the certificate information was legitimate.

    As the app only displayed the host IP address and a line beginning ‘sha256:e57a1d8b9248….’, most users will probably dismiss the dialog and pretend they never saw it. We browsed the data, though, and found what looked like a free Let’s Encrypt certificate which had exp

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    Enterprise

    Facebook floats ‘Jaadhu Holdings’ to do business with Jio

    Jaadhu, in Hindi, means magic.Well, that is what Facebook probably hopes to create with its $5.7 billion (Rs 43,573 crore) investment in Reliance Jio Platforms for a 9.99% stake.Economic Times, “Jio Platforms, Facebook-owned instant messaging service WhatsApp Inc and Reliance Retail Ltd will also enter into a separate commercial agreement.”Over 1200 Kirana stores join hands…

    Jaadhu, in Hindi, means magic.

    Well, that is what Facebook probably hopes to create with its $5.7 billion (Rs 43,573 crore) investment in Reliance Jio Platforms for a 9.99% stake.

    Economic Times, “Jio Platforms, Facebook-owned instant messaging service WhatsApp Inc and Reliance Retail Ltd will also enter into a separate commercial agreement.”

    • Over 1200 Kirana stores join hands with JioMart, Facebook pilot program
    • Jio Mart to sell smartphones and electronics
    • WhatsApp as an e-commerce platform gets unveiled

    Local is the goal 

    Ineterestingly, the official filing echoes the larger political exhortation from Prime Minister Narendra Modi for being “vocal for local”.  

    “The Proposed Transaction and the Proposed Commercial Arrangement are pro-competitive, benefits consumers, Kirana (corner) stores and other small and micro local Indian businesses, and take forward the vision of digital India,” the filing read.

    The deal will help Reliance cut its spiraling debt pile while providing the social media giant with a strong foothold in India’s fast-growing market. Facebook’s decision to move ahead with the investment despite the looming risk of a global economic meltdown signals it

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