Antivirus

Best mining software

While the value of cryto currencies such as Bitcoin may have fallen over the past year, the underlying distributed ledger technology (DLT) still has a good long-term outlook.Though at present crypto currencies are not regulated, the overwhelming success of Bitcoin (BTC), along with Ethereum (ETH), Ripple (XRP), and Litecoin (LTC), means that governments and banks…


While the value of cryto currencies such as Bitcoin may have fallen over the past year, the underlying distributed ledger technology (DLT) still has a good long-term outlook.

Though at present crypto currencies are not regulated, the overwhelming success of Bitcoin (BTC), along with Ethereum (ETH), Ripple (XRP), and Litecoin (LTC), means that governments and banks are already considering how to bring them into mainstream use.

Bitcoin (BTC) mining hardware or mining rig, your next step is to connect to a mining ‘pool’. This allows you to share your machine’s resources over the internet and receive a portion of the mining profits in return.

There are a number of programs available to help manage your crypto-mining. In this guide, we’ve explored five of the most popular. If you’re an experienced computer user, you may prefer to install the free operating system Linux and make use of one of the text-only programs such as CGminer.

If you prefer to keep things simple and are sticking with Windows 10, mining clients with a GUI such as MultiMiner may suit you better.

Before getting started, if you want to be sure a mining program will work with your particular device or operating system, the Bitcoin Wiki has a very helpful list.

  • We also show you how to mine Bitcoins

(Image credit: CGMiner)

1. CGMiner

A flexible mining program that supports almost every platform

CGMiner has been around for over six years and is coded in C, meaning it’s compatible with almost all operating systems. It works via a simple command line interface and supports multiple mining pools and devices. It’s primarily designed to be used with hardware mining devices but can make use of any GPUs connected to your machine as well.

On first run, CGMiner will ask you to enter the URL, username and password (if necessary) for your mining pool, and it will automatically detect any hardware you have connected such as an ASIC device. 

Although you have to work with CGMiner via the command line, the layout is very easy on the eye: mining devices are listed at the top and you can use simple keyboard commands to change your settings (e.g. to enable verbose mode or detect new hardware).

During our tests using CGMiner 4.9.2 on Windows 10, we found that Windows Defender and our antivirus software tried to block the download. This may be because hackers using their own versions of this program could secretly install CGMiner on someone else’s machine to mine for their own benefit. You can configure your system to make an exception for CGMiner if you wish, or use the Linux version.

  • Download CGMiner here

(Image credit: Bitminter)

2. Bitminter

Another cross-platform program

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Antivirus

From the AI arms race to adversarial AI

The AI arms race is on, and it’s a cat and mouse game we see every day in our threat intelligence work. As new technology evolves, our lives become more convenient, but cybercriminals see new opportunities to attack users. Whether it’s trying to circumvent antivirus software, or trying to install malware or ransomware on a…

The AI arms race is on, and it’s a cat and mouse game we see every day in our threat intelligence work. As new technology evolves, our lives become more convenient, but cybercriminals see new opportunities to attack users. Whether it’s trying to circumvent antivirus software, or trying to install malware or ransomware on a user’s machine, to abusing hacked devices to create a botnet or taking down websites and important server infrastructures, getting ahead of the bad guys is the priority for security providers. AI has increased the sophistication of attacks, making it increasingly unpredictable and difficult to mitigate against. 

About the author

Michal Pěchouček, CTO, Avast.

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AI has reduced the manpower needed to carry out a cyber-attack. As opposed to manually developing malware code, this process has become automated, reducing the time, effort and expense that goes into these attacks. The result: attacks become increasingly systema

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2019 was a challenging year for organisations trying to reduce the likelihood and minimise the impact of IT outages. As we have seen, both businesses and public sector bodies are increasingly being targeted by opportunistic cybercriminals looking for vulnerabilities to exploit. The effects of these attacks have been devastating for some organisations. Unfortunately, despite improvements…

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Mac malware threats are increasing according to Malwarebytes – but don’t panic just yet

Malwarebytes labs, the security researchers behind the popular Malwarebytes antivirus software, has released a new report that claims that Mac threat detection has risen in 2019.In the report, Malwarebytes looked at the top threat detections across Windows, Macs and Android devices. It found that of the top 25 detections, six of them were found on…

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In the report, Malwarebytes looked at the top threat detections across Windows, Macs and Android devices. It found that of the top 25 detections, six of them were found on Macs. This means six of the threats that were found on the most devices were Mac threats.

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Malwarebytes provided a chart showing detections per device

Malwarebytes provided a chart showing detections per device (Image credit: Malwarebytes)

More detections per Mac

Another worrying detail to emerge fro

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Antivirus

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About the author

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These global shifts have already radically re-shaped the way we live. Yet, the ways we establish trust and verify identity remain stuck in the pa

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