GDPR

AI’s memory is perfect for insight into collective behaviour

AI was never intended to give insights into collective behaviour, yet it’s becoming an increasingly efficient method of doing so. In an age of the GDPR fearful, collective behaviour is the way forward to understanding consumer preferences and AI’s memory of data allows this to happen without jeopardising individual behaviour. Three ways CIOs can successfully scale AITrump…


AI was never intended to give insights into collective behaviour, yet it’s becoming an increasingly efficient method of doing so. 

In an age of the GDPR fearful, collective behaviour is the way forward to understanding consumer preferences and AI’s memory of data allows this to happen without jeopardising individual behaviour. 

  • Three ways CIOs can successfully scale AI
  • Trump administration orders research into AI
  • Three quarters of smartphones will have AI chip by 2022

Early beginnings

Alan Turing was recently named as the most ‘iconic’ figure of the 20th century. Perhaps this is because of the explosive interest and power that artificial intelligence is set to have on our world in the near future. 

He was a mathematician who cracked codes during World War II and praised with shortening the war by several years due to his work at Bletchley Park. Here, he was tasked with cracking the ‘Enigma’ code and, with another code-breaker, invented a machine known as the Bombe which has had a huge influence on the development of computer science and artificial intelligence.

Turing suggested that humans use available information as well as reason in order to solve problems and make decisions, so machines should, in theory, be able to do the same. This was the logical framework of his 1950 paper, Computing Machinery and Intelligence, in which he discusses how to build intelligent machines and how to test their intelligence.

After a conference in 1956 where, what is considered by many, to be the first AI programme was presented, a flurry of interest in AI ensued. Computers could store more information and became faster, cheaper, and more accessible. Machine learning algorithms improved and people got better at knowing which algorithm to apply to their problem. However, a mountain of

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GDPR

Marriott owner facing huge GDPR breach fine

The owner of the Marriott hotel chain is set to face a £99m fine following a data breach that left thousand of customer details exposed.The fine from the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) comes after the personal data of approximately 339 million guest records globally were breachedd following a cyberattack.Amazon Prime Day deals: see all…


The owner of the Marriott hotel chain is set to face a £99m fine following a data breach that left thousand of customer details exposed.

The fine from the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) comes after the personal data of approximately 339 million guest records globally were breachedd following a cyberattack.

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The breach was referred to the ICO by Marriott in November 2018 as around 30 million of those customers affected were residents of 31 countries in the European Economic Area (EEA) – and seven million related

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GDPR

Predicting the Future of Internet Privacy

About the authorBrett Dunst is the vice president of corporate communications at DreamHost.Every day, a new headline reminds us that keeping our online data private remains a constant struggle. Ongoing controversies involving Facebook and other social media sites only reinforce the point. It’s become depressingly common to hear of security breaches involving organizations who have…


About the author

Brett Dunst is the vice president of corporate communications at DreamHost.

Every day, a new headline reminds us that keeping our online data private remains a constant struggle. Ongoing controversies involving Facebook and other social media sites only reinforce the point. It’s become depressingly common to hear of security breaches involving organizations who have been given access to our personal data—organizations that we’ve often never even heard of before!

How did we get here? History shows that we’ve come a long way in a short time, and reminds us that we don’t lack for founding principles. History also reminds us that our attitudes toward online privacy and the ways we attempt to control it have evolved. So, where is the next evolution going to take us? We have some ideas.

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1) Encryption Will Become the New Normal

Encryption is an admittedly big tent. It encompasses everything from the hashing that safeguards passwords to the algorithms that guarantee the authenticity of digital signatures. Whatever form it takes, however, encryption represents the tech industry’s attempt to address the various issues clustering aro

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GDPR

UAE data protection law, similar to GDPR, likely landing this year

The UAE is looking at implementing a data protection law, similar to EU’s introduction of General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in 2008, as part of the UAE National Cybersecurity Strategy.TRA has launched the 2020-2025 strategy as the country is entering the fifth-generation era in a bid to enable swift and coordinated response to cyber incidents…


The UAE is looking at implementing a data protection law, similar to EU’s introduction of General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in 2008, as part of the UAE National Cybersecurity Strategy.

TRA has launched the 2020-2025 strategy as the country is entering the fifth-generation era in a bid to enable swift and coordinated response to cyber incidents in the UAE.  “Part of the strategy is that data privacy is crucial to the cyber and the UAE is regulating and drafting a data protection law. We will look at the best performing practices performed worldwide; GDPR will be one of the inputs to it. We want to make sure that whatever regulations are put, are easy to be implemented across different sectors,” Mohammad Al Zarooni, Director of Policies and Programs Department at Telecommunications Regulatory Authority (TRA) of the UAE,told TechRadar Middle East, at an event.

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GDPR

Security is now a board level issue: how to secure the data supply chain

It has never been more crucial for businesses to implement and demonstrate their commitment to cybersecurity; with data increasingly being used to make significant business decisions. While historically, the major concerns for senior management around IT security have focused on intellectual property theft and reputational risk, ongoing changes in technology and politics have changed today’s business…


It has never been more crucial for businesses to implement and demonstrate their commitment to cybersecurity; with data increasingly being used to make significant business decisions. 

While historically, the major concerns for senior management around IT security have focused on intellectual property theft and reputational risk, ongoing changes in technology and politics have changed today’s business landscape and priorities significantly. With GDPR now in full force, organisations must demonstrate to stakeholders that they are making a credible effort to ensure that security is built into the heart of business operations. 

IT security budgets are falling

  • Half of organizations lack the security talent needed to remain secure
  • Empowering CISOs to strengthen password security
  • Vulnerabilities in the data supply chain

    Organisations must first understand what potential vulnerabilities look like within a data supply chain, so they can be recognised and mitigated. As cyberattacks increase in sophistication, they are likely to be so subtle that they don’t visibly impact a system; providing misleading information to force erroneous decisions. Ironically, whilst this type of attack will be very difficult to detect, early identification is vital in order to prevent significant damage.

    The first

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