GDPR

4 trends that are changing the data conversation

Businesses simply cannot operate effectively today without a healthy stream of data to inform real-time decision making. As its value increases, businesses have to navigate a complicated regulatory landscape, privacy concerns and new technologies which thrive on data. For almost every arm of the organization, data is priority number one.Here are a few of the…


Businesses simply cannot operate effectively today without a healthy stream of data to inform real-time decision making. As its value increases, businesses have to navigate a complicated regulatory landscape, privacy concerns and new technologies which thrive on data. For almost every arm of the organization, data is priority number one.

Here are a few of the major data trends to keep an eye on this year:

  • A new era in data awareness
  • Data privacy: will it be as in vogue as it was in 2018?
  • Is privacy the new customer experience grail?

1. Consumer privacy and GDPR enforcement begins in earnest

When GDPR took hold in May 2018, regulatory officials began realizing the inherent complexity facing organizations as they implemented tools and processes required to address compliance. This may partially explain why there has been only one major enforcement action applied to non-compliant businesses since coming into effect.

The International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), however,recently positedthat this will become increasingly common, citing an investigation by the UK Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). To understand the timeframe between when a violation occurred, when a complaint was issued and when a regulatory action was levied against the organization, the study looked at the 100 most-recent enforcement actions by the ICO in an attempt to determine when we can expect punitive actions by GDPR enforcement officials.

Their conclusion? Drawing an average between the minimum time from violation-to-penalty (six days,) and the maximum (1,064 days,) the IAPP determined a likely window for regulatory actions may be in the range of 338 days, or around February 22, 2019. It is likely, however, that due to the complexity and scale of preparing to meet GDPR requirements for many large enterprises, regional regulators will apply some degree of leniency until the second half of 2019.

Image Credit: Shutterstock

Image Credit: Shutterstock

(Image: © Shutterstock)

2. Consumer privacy for “offline” data become

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GDPR

Data privacy: better the nanny state, the Wild West or a coalition of the willing?

After countless data breaches and scandals relating to major tech behemoths’ cavalier usage of our personal data, it would seem natural to assume that Brits have decided to police their own privacy with much greater intent. On the contrary, post-Cambridge Analytica and the #DeleteFacebook movement, UK user numbers have grown over the last year, passing…


After countless data breaches and scandals relating to major tech behemoths’ cavalier usage of our personal data, it would seem natural to assume that Brits have decided to police their own privacy with much greater intent. On the contrary, post-Cambridge Analytica and the #DeleteFacebook movement, UK user numbers have grown over the last year, passing 40 million for the first time (around 60 per cent of the UK population). 

Furthermore, the rate at which people accept default options and blindly accept T&Cs and privacy policies only increases as our digital lives become more cluttered. According to a survey by Deloitte, 90% of consumers accept legal terms and conditions without reading them.

If we can’t help ourselves as consumers, who will? 

  • Data Protection Day 2019: Privacy firmly in the limelight
  • Data privacy: will it be as in vogue as it was in 2018?
  • A new era in data awareness

Consumer protections

Enter Her Majesty’s Government. It seems that various factions across Government have come to the conclusion, almost in unison, that greater consumer protections are needed. With GDPR still the soundtrack to last summer that’s ringing in our ears, a slew of Government activity is underway to crack down on big tech companies, and some is directed specifically at ensuring greater privacy protections. 

Recently, Jeremy Wright, the Digital secretary, unv

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GDPR

EMEA businesses ‘under constant cyberattack’

European businesses are facing more cyberattacks than ever before as criminals widen the reach of their assaults, new research has found.A wide-ranging report by NTT Security discovered that financial firms are seeing a particular rise in the threats they face, accounting for 30 percent of all attacks recorded on the continent last year. This was…


European businesses are facing more cyberattacks than ever before as criminals widen the reach of their assaults, new research has found.

A wide-ranging report by NTT Security discovered that financial firms are seeing a particular rise in the threats they face, accounting for 30 percent of all attacks recorded on the continent last year.

This was followed by the business and professional services sector (24 percent), technology (17 percent) and manufacturing (nine percent), with the finance industry also seeing a major increase in web atatcks, which grew from 22 percent to 43 percent.

  • Best internet security suites of 2019
  • What is GDPR? Everything you need to know
  • Over 10 billion malware attacks detected in 2018

TechRadar Prowas invited to NTT Security’s Security Operations Centre (SOC) in Gothenburg to get a first look at the company’s 2019 Global Threat Intelligence Report (GTIR).

The 120-year-old company, which gets visibility over 40 percent of the world’s entire internet traffic to examine trillions of data logs worldwide ever year, sifting through billions of attacks, comprised its report to see which sectors are most at risk of attack.

The 20

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GDPR

GDPR Subject Access Request: authentication cannot be an afterthought

As the deadline approached last year, companies scrambled to update their data protection practices. As it happened, some companies did get fined for non-compliance. Following a long period of adjustment, however, GDPR requirements have become normalised into existing compliance programs.What many companies were ill-prepared for was the onslaught of consumers exercising their rights under the…


As the deadline approached last year, companies scrambled to update their data protection practices. As it happened, some companies did get fined for non-compliance. Following a long period of adjustment, however, GDPR requirements have become normalised into existing compliance programs.

What many companies were ill-prepared for was the onslaught of consumers exercising their rights under the new regime. Under GDPR, a consumer can file a Subject Access Request (SAR) with an organisation to determine if that organisation is processing personal data concerning him or her, and, if the information has been shared, along with the names of the parties with which it has been shared. 

In fact, these are only but a few of the searching questions that the user, as the data subject, can demand answers to. Further, once the SAR has been dispatched to the organisation, it is legally obligated to comply with the request, retrieve the information, and formally respond to the data subject – all within a month.  

  • Satya Nadella calls for global GDPR
  • Majority of companies still aren’t GDPR-compliant
  • The ramifications of GDPR

Subject Access Request

SARs hav

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GDPR

The majority of the EU just accepted controversial new online copyright laws

It was already something of a foregone conclusion, but Europe’s controversial new online copyright law took another step towards becoming official this week. The European Union announced on Monday that 19 of the 28 member nations in the European Council voted to pass the new Copyright Directive law. Italy and Poland were among those who…


It was already something of a foregone conclusion, but Europe’s controversial new online copyright law took another step towards becoming official this week.

The European Union announced on Monday that 19 of the 28 member nations in the European Council voted to pass the new Copyright Directive law. Italy and Poland were among those who voted in opposition to the bill, while Estonia, Belgium and Slovenia abstained.

Regardless, each EU member nation now has two years to start enforcing the law that some have said is tantamount to widespread internet censorship.

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